Animalia > Chordata > Elasmobranchii > Carcharhiniformes > Carcharhinidae > Carcharhinus > Carcharhinus signatus
 

Carcharhinus signatus (Shark; Night shark)

Synonyms: Hypoprion bigelowi; Hypoprion longirostris; Hypoprion signatus
Language: Danish; Dutch; French; Mandarin Chinese; Portuguese; Spanish

Wikipedia Abstract

The night shark (Carcharhinus signatus) is a species of requiem shark, in the family Carcharhinidae, found in the temperate and tropical waters of the Atlantic Ocean. An inhabitant of the outer continental shelf and upper continental slope, this shark most commonly occurs at depths of 50–600 m (160–1,970 ft) and conducts a diel vertical migration, spending the day in deeper water and moving into shallower waters at night. Off northeastern Brazil, large numbers congregate around seamounts of varying depth. A slender, streamlined species, the night shark typically reaches a length of 2 m (6.6 ft). It can be identified by its long pointed snout and large green eyes (when alive), and is dark grayish blue or brown above and white below.
View Wikipedia Record: Carcharhinus signatus

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  93.002 lbs (42.185 kg)
Female Maturity [1]  10 years
Litter Size [1]  11
Maximum Longevity [1]  32 years

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Carcharhinus leucas (Zambezi shark)[5]

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Grillotia carvajalregorum[6]
Heteronybelinia nipponica[6]
Heteronybelinia yamagutii[6]

Distribution

Angola; Argentina; Atlantic Ocean; Atlantic, Eastern Central; Atlantic, Northwest; Atlantic, Southeast; Atlantic, Southwest; Atlantic, Western Central; Bahamas; Benguela Current; Benin; Brazil; Cameroon; Canary Current; Caribbean Sea; Congo, Dem. Rep. of the; Congo, Republic of; Cuba; Côte d'Ivoire; East Brazil Shelf; Equatorial Guinea; Gabon; Gambia; Ghana; Guinea; Guinea Current; Guinea-Bissau; Gulf of Mexico; Guyana; Liberia; Mexico; Namibia; Nicaragua; Nigeria; North Brazil Shelf; Northeast U.S. Continental Shelf; Pacific Central-American Coastal; Pacific Ocean; Pacific, Eastern Central; Panama; Patagonian Shelf; Sao Tomé and Principe; Senegal; Sierra Leone; South Brazil Shelf; Southeast U.S. Continental Shelf; Togo; Trinidad and Tobago; USA (contiguous states); Uruguay; Western Atlantic: Delaware to Florida (USA), Bahamas, and Cuba; southern Brazil, Argentina. Eastern Atlantic: Senegal to Côte d'Ivoire, Ghana to Cameroon, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Angola, off northern Namibia (Ref. 5578).;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
2FEEDING STRATEGY OF THE NIGHT SHARK (CARCHARHINUS SIGNATUS) AND SCALLOPED HAMMERHEAD SHARK (SPHYRNA LEWINI) NEAR SEAMOUNTS OFF NORTHEASTERN BRAZIL, Teodoro Vaske Júnior; Carolus Maria Vooren and Rosangela Paula Lessa, BRAZILIAN JOURNAL OF OCEANOGRAPHY, 57(2):97-104, 2009
3Food of Northwest Atlantic Fishes and Two Common Species of Squid, Ray E. Bowman, Charles E. Stillwell, William L. Michaels, and Marvin D. Grosslein, NOAA Technical Memorandum NMFS-NE-155 (2000)
4Food composition and distribution of elasmobranches on the shelf and upper slope of the Eastern Central Atlantic., Patokina F.A., Litvinov F.F., ICES CM 2005/N:26
5Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
6Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License