Animalia > Chordata > Actinopterygii > Tetraodontiformes > Balistidae > Melichthys > Melichthys niger
 

Melichthys niger (Pigger; Niggerfish; Niger head; Blackfish; Black triggerfish; Black oldwife; Black durgon; Black durgeon)

Synonyms:
Language: Afrikaans; Carolinian; Creole, French; Creole, Portuguese; Danish; French; Fw; Fwâi; German; Hawaiian; Japanese; Kiribati; Mahl; Malay; Malayalam; Mandarin Chinese; Other; Papiamento; Polish; Portuguese; Samoan; Spanish; Tuamotuan; Visayan

Wikipedia Abstract

The black triggerfish or black durgon (Melichthys niger), called Humuhumu'ele'ele in Hawaiian, is a blimp-shaped triggerfish with bright white lines running along its dorsal and anal fins. From a distance, it appears to be completely black. However, upon closer inspection with good lighting, one can see that it is actually mottled dark-blue/green coloration often with orange toward the front of the head. Black durgons are capable of changing color based on their surroundings.
View Wikipedia Record: Melichthys niger

Protected Areas

Prey / Diet

Predators

Carcharhinus perezii (Caribbean reef shark)[1]
Lutjanus jocu (Snuggletooth snapper)[1]
Rhizoprionodon porosus (Snook shark)[1]
Seriola dumerili (Yellow tail)[1]

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Hysterothylacium melichthysi <Unverified Name>[2]
Neobenedenia melleni[2]

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Distribution

Agulhas Current; American Samoa; Anguilla; Antigua and Barbuda; Aruba; Ascension Island; Atlantic Ocean; Atlantic, Eastern Central; Atlantic, Southeast; Atlantic, Southwest; Atlantic, Western Central; Australia; Bahamas; Barbados; Belize; Brazil; California Current; Canary Current; Cape Verde; Caribbean Sea; Cayman Islands; Chagos Islands; Christmas Island (Aust.); Circumtropical. Western Pacific: Ryukyu and Ogasawara islands eastward to the Tuamoto Islands. Eastern Pacific: San Diego, California, USA to Malpelo Island, Colombia (Ref. 9276). Western Atlantic: Florida, USA and Bahamas to Brazil (Ref. 7251). Ab; Circumtropical. Western Pacific: Ryukyu and Ogasawara islands eastward to the Tuamoto Islands. Eastern Pacific: San Diego, California, USA to Malpelo Island, Colombia (Ref. 9276). Western Atlantic: Florida, USA and Bahamas to Brazil (Ref. 7251). Absent in Gulf of Mexico (Ref. 26938). Eastern Atlantic: St. Paul's Rocks (13121), St. Helena, Ascension Island, Rolas Island, and Cape Verde (Ref. 7348). São Tomé Island (Ref. 34088). Western Indian Ocean: Durban, Natal, South Africa (Ref. 4420). Uncommon in most areas but abundant around isolated oceanic islands (Ref. 9710).; Clipperton Island; Cocos (Keeling) Islands; Cocos I. Costa Rica; Colombia; Cook Islands; Costa Rica; Cuba; Curaçao Island; Discovery Bay; Dominica; Dominican Republic; East Brazil Shelf; El Salvador; French Guiana; Galapagos Islands; Grenada; Guadeloupe; Guam; Guatemala; Guyana; Haiti; Hawaii (USA); Honduras; India; Indian Ocean; Indian Ocean, Eastern; Indian Ocean, Western; Indonesia; Insular Pacific-Hawaiian; Jamaica; Japan; Kuroshio Current; Maldives; Marshall Islands; Martinique; Mexico; Micronesia,Fed.States of; Montserrat; Mozambique; Nicaragua; Niue; North Australian Shelf; North Brazil Shelf; North Marianas; Ogasawara Islands; Pacific Central-American Coastal; Pacific Ocean; Pacific, Eastern Central; Pacific, Northwest; Pacific, Southeast; Pacific, Western Central; Palau; Panama; Panay Gulf; Papua New Guinea; Peru-Galapagos Waters; Philippines; Polynesian Waters; Puerto Rico; Revillagigedo; Ryukyu Islands; Réunion; Saint Helena; Saint Kitts and Nevis; Saint Lucia; Saint Paul's Rocks; Saint Vincent & the Grenadines; Samoa; Sao Tomé and Principe; Seychelles; Somalia; South Africa; South Brazil Shelf; South China Sea; Southeast U.S. Continental Shelf; Sri Lanka; Sulu-Celebes Sea; Suriname; Trindade Island; Trinidad and Tobago; Tuamoto Islands; Tubbataha Reefs; Turks and Caicos Is.; US Virgin Islands; USA (contiguous states); Venezuela; Virgin Islands (UK); Wake Island;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
2Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
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