Animalia > Chordata > Elasmobranchii > Carcharhiniformes > Scyliorhinidae > Scyliorhinus > Scyliorhinus canicula
 

Scyliorhinus canicula (Small-spotted catshark; Smallspotted catshark; Small-spotted cat shark; Small spotted dog; Sandy dogfish; Rough hound; Rough dog; Lesser spotted dogfish; Fay dog; Dogfish; Small-spotted dogfish)

Synonyms:
Language: Albanian; Arabic; Catalan; Croatian; Czech; Danish; Dutch; Finnish; French; German; Greek; Hebrew; Icelandic; Italian; Maltese; Mandarin Chinese; Manx; Norwegian; Polish; Portuguese; Russian; Serbian; Spanish; Swedish; Turkish; Ukrainian

Wikipedia Abstract

The small-spotted catshark (Scyliorhinus canicula), also known as the lesser-spotted dogfish, Rough-hound, or Morgay (in Scotland and Cornwall), is a catshark of the family Scyliorhinidae. It is found on the continental shelves and the uppermost continental slopes off the coasts of Norway and the British Isles south to Senegal and in the Mediterranean, between latitudes 63° N and 12° N. It can grow up to a length of 1 m (3 ft 3 in), and it can weigh more than 2 kg (4.4 lb). It is found primarily over sandy, gravelly, or muddy bottoms from depths of a few metres down to 400 m. S. canicula is one of the most abundant elasmobranchs in the Northeast Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea. The majority of the populations are stable in most areas.
View Wikipedia Record: Scyliorhinus canicula

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  1.601 lbs (726 g)
Female Maturity [1]  7 years 7 months
Male Maturity [1]  4 years 6 months
Litter Size [1]  46
Maximum Longevity [1]  12 years

Protected Areas

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Distribution

Aegean Sea; Albania; Algeria; Atlantic Ocean; Atlantic, Eastern Central; Atlantic, Northeast; Belgium; Black Sea; Bosnia and Herzegovina; Canary Current; Canary Islands; Cantabrian Sea; Celtic-Biscay Shelf; Croatia; Cyprus; Denmark; Egypt; France; Galician Shelf; Germany, Fed. Rep.; Gibraltar; Greece; Iberian Coastal; Iceland; Ireland; Isle of Man; Israel; Italy; Lebanon; Libyan Arab Jamahiriya; Malta; Mauritania; Mediterranean Sea; Mediterranean and Black Sea; Monaco; Morocco; Netherlands; North Sea; Northeast Atlantic: Norway and British Isles south to Senegal, including the Mediterranean. Possibly Côte d'Ivoire. Some populational differences exist between <i>Catulus duhameli</i> (a name for the Mediterranean <i>canicula</i> based on size) and thi; Northeast Atlantic: Norway and British Isles south to Senegal, including the Mediterranean. Possibly Côte d'Ivoire. Some populational differences exist between <i>Catulus duhameli</i> (a name for the Mediterranean <i>canicula</i> based on size) and this species which may eventually be expressed as subspecies. The only reported observation of this species in Crimean waters was in 1937, which is possibly erroneous (Ref. 897).; Norway; Norwegian Sea; Portugal; Sea of Marmara; Senegal; Serbia and Montenegro; Slovenia; Spain; Sweden; Syrian Arab Republic; Tagus; Tunisia; Turkey; United Kingdom; Western Sahara;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
2Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
3Physiological energetics of Buccinum undatum L. (Gastropoda) off Douglas, Isle of Man (the Irish Sea), Ahmet E. KIDEYŞ, Tr. J. of Zoology 22 (1998) 49-61
4Feeding habits and trophic levels of Mediterranean fish, Konstantinos I. Stergiou & Vasiliki S. Karpouzi, Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries 11: 217–254, 2002
5Martinho, Felipe and Sá, Cátia and Falcão, Joana and Cabral, Henrique Nogueira and Pardal, Miguel Ângelo (2012) Comparative feeding ecology of two elasmobranch species, Squalus blainville and Scyliorhinus canicula, off the coast of Portugal. Fishery Bulletin, 110(1), pp. 71-84.
6Feeding ecology of demersal elasmobranchs from the shelf and slope off the Balearic Sea (western Mediterranean), MARIA VALLS, ANTONI QUETGLAS, FRANCESC ORDINES and JOAN MORANTA, Scientia Marina 75(4) December 2011, 633-639, Barcelona (Spain)
7Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Protected Areas provided by GBIF Global Biodiversity Information Facility
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License