Animalia > Chordata > Actinopterygii > Beloniformes > Belonidae > Strongylura > Strongylura marina
 

Strongylura marina (Atlantic needlefish; Swordfish; Silvery gar; Silver gar; Sea pike; Saltwater gar; Northern needlefish; Harvest pike; Green gar; Garfish; Bluebone; Billfish; Agujon)

Synonyms:
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Wikipedia Abstract

Strongylura marina, known commonly as the Atlantic needlefish, is a common demersal needlefish species common in marinas and other areas with minimal current. Its extremely long jaw and body set this fish apart from other predators. Atlantic needlefish are found from Maine to Brazil and have been known to venture into freshwater for short periods.
View Wikipedia Record: Strongylura marina

Attributes

Adult Length [1]  3.641 feet (111 cm)
Brood Dispersal [1]  In the open
Brood Egg Substrate [1]  Phytophils
Brood Guarder [1]  No
Litter Size [1]  1,000
Maximum Longevity [1]  4 years
Diet [2]  Omnivore
Female Maturity [1]  1 year

Protected Areas

Prey / Diet

Anchoa mitchilli (Bay anchovy)[3]
Leptochelia rapax[3]

Predators

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Allopyragraphorus marinae[4]
Ancyrocephalus parvus[4]
Neoechinorhynchus rostratus[4]
Nudaciraxine gracilis[4]
Pomphorhynchus lucyi[4]

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

    Maps
Institution Infraspecies / Breed 
Florida Aquarium
National Aquarium in Baltimore Inc

Range Map

Distribution

Western Atlantic: Maine, USA and northern Gulf of Mexico to Brazil. Absent from the Bahamas and Antilles (Ref. 3129).;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Frimpong, E.A., and P. L. Angermeier. 2009. FishTraits: a database of ecological and life-history traits of freshwater fishes of the United States. Fisheries 34:487-495.
2Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
3Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
4Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License