Animalia > Chordata > Actinopterygii > Clupeiformes > Clupeidae > Alosa > Alosa pseudoharengus
 

Alosa pseudoharengus (kyack; Alewife; River herring; White herring; Sawbelly; Kyak; Greyback; Grayback; Gray herring; Freshwater herring; Corned alewives; Clipped roefish; Branch herring; Bigeye herring; Anadromous alewives)

Synonyms:
Language: Czech; Danish; Dutch; Finnish; French; German; Greek; Icelandic; Italian; Mandarin Chinese; Norwegian; Polish; Portuguese; Romanian; Russian; Serbian; Spanish; Swedish

Wikipedia Abstract

The alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus) is an anadromous species of herring found in North America. It is one of the "typical" North American shads, attributed to the subgenus Pomolobus of the genus Alosa. As an adult it is a marine species found in the northern West Atlantic Ocean, moving into estuaries before swimming upstream to breed in fresh water habitats, but some populations live entirely in fresh water. It is best known for its invasion of the Great Lakes by using the Welland Canal to bypass Niagara Falls. Here its population surged, peaking between the 1950s and 1980s to the detriment of many native species of fish, and Pacific salmon were introduced to control them. As a marine fish, the alewife is a US National Marine Fisheries Service "Species of Concern".
View Wikipedia Record: Alosa pseudoharengus

Invasive Species

Alosa pseudoharengus (alewife) is a small, fish species indigenous to the east coast of North America that causes several major effects in aquatic environments. Alewife migrate from the ocean to spawn in fresh water. It can occupy all strata of a land-locked body of water throughout the course of the year. A. pseudoharengus alters the zooplankton community as it is an extremely efficient feeder on zooplankton, competing with other fish species for food. Alewife feed on the eggs and larvae of other fish and thereby can cause other fish species to decline. It is often stocked as a forage fish.
View ISSG Record: Alosa pseudoharengus

Attributes

Adult Length [2]  16 inches (40 cm)
Brood Dispersal [2]  In the open
Brood Egg Substrate [2]  Phyto-lithophils
Brood Guarder [2]  No
Litter Size [2]  300,000
Maximum Longevity [2]  8 years
Migration [1]  Anadromous
Nocturnal [1]  Yes
Water Biome [1]  Lakes and Ponds, Rivers and Streams, Coastal
Adult Weight [3]  110 grams
Diet [1]  Planktivore
Female Maturity [2]  4 years 6 months
Male Maturity [3]  3 years 6 months

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Ecosystems

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

    Maps
Institution Infraspecies / Breed 
John G. Shedd Aquarium

Range Map

Distribution

America, North - Inland waters; Atlantic Ocean; Atlantic, Northwest; Atlantic, Western Central; Canada; Great Lakes; Nearctic; Newfoundland-Labrador Shelf; North America: Atlantic coast from the Gulf of St. Lawrence and Nova Scotia to North Carolina and in streams and rivers; also occurs in Lake Seneca and Cayuga; introduced into Lake Ontario, now landlocked there and in Lakes Erie, Huron, Michigan and Supe; North America: Atlantic coast from the Gulf of St. Lawrence and Nova Scotia to North Carolina and in streams and rivers; also occurs in Lake Seneca and Cayuga; introduced into Lake Ontario, now landlocked there and in Lakes Erie, Huron, Michigan and Superior.; Northeast U.S. Continental Shelf; Scotian Shelf; USA (contiguous states);

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
2Frimpong, E.A., and P. L. Angermeier. 2009. FishTraits: a database of ecological and life-history traits of freshwater fishes of the United States. Fisheries 34:487-495.
3de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
4Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
5Food of Northwest Atlantic Fishes and Two Common Species of Squid, Ray E. Bowman, Charles E. Stillwell, William L. Michaels, and Marvin D. Grosslein, NOAA Technical Memorandum NMFS-NE-155 (2000)
6NOAA, Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory
7Food Web Relationships of Northern Puget Sound and the Strait of Juan de Fuca : a Synthesis of the Available Knowledge, Charles A. Simenstad, Bruce S. Miller, Carl F. Nyblade, Kathleen Thornburgh, and Lewis J. Bledsoe, EPA-600 7-29-259 September 1979
8Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License