Animalia > Chordata > Actinopterygii > Clupeiformes > Clupeidae > Alosa > Alosa sapidissima
 

Alosa sapidissima (American shad; White shad; Susquehanna shad; Shad; Potomac shad; North River shad; Herring jack; Connecticut River shad; Common shad; Atlantic shad)

Synonyms: Alosa praestabilis; Clupea sapidissima
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Wikipedia Abstract

The American shad (Alosa sapidissima), is a species of anadromous clupeid fish naturally distributed on the North American coast of the North Atlantic, from Newfoundland to Florida, and as an introduced species on the North Pacific coast. The American shad is not closely related to the other North American shads. Rather, it seems to form a lineage that diverged from a common ancestor of the European taxa before these diversified
View Wikipedia Record: Alosa sapidissima

Attributes

Adult Length [1]  30 inches (76 cm)
Brood Dispersal [1]  In the open
Brood Egg Substrate [1]  Pelagophils
Brood Guarder [1]  No
Litter Size [1]  500,000
Maximum Longevity [1]  13 years
Migration [3]  Anadromous
Adult Weight [2]  6.669 lbs (3.025 kg)
Diet [3]  Omnivore
Female Maturity [1]  4 years 7 months
Male Maturity [2]  4 years 3 months

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Emblem of

Connecticut

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Consumers

Range Map

Distribution

Alaska (USA); America, North - Inland waters; Asia - Inland waters; Atlantic Ocean; Atlantic, Northwest; Atlantic, Western Central; California Current; Canada; Europe - Inland waters; Gulf of Alaska; Kamchatka; Mexico; Nearctic; Newfoundland-Labrador Shelf; North America: Newfoundland (Ref. 1998), the St. Lawrence River, and Nova Scotia southward to central Florida. Due to introductions into the Sacramento and Columbia Rivers, this species is now found from Cook Inlet, Alaska (Ref. 1998) to Baja California; North America: Newfoundland (Ref. 1998), the St. Lawrence River, and Nova Scotia southward to central Florida. Due to introductions into the Sacramento and Columbia Rivers, this species is now found from Cook Inlet, Alaska (Ref. 1998) to Baja California in Mexico and the Kamchatka Peninsula.; Northeast U.S. Continental Shelf; Pacific Ocean; Pacific, Eastern Central; Pacific, Northeast; Pacific, Northwest; Palearctic; Russian Federation; Scotian Shelf; St. Lawrence; USA (contiguous states);

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Frimpong, E.A., and P. L. Angermeier. 2009. FishTraits: a database of ecological and life-history traits of freshwater fishes of the United States. Fisheries 34:487-495.
2de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
3Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
4Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
5Food of Northwest Atlantic Fishes and Two Common Species of Squid, Ray E. Bowman, Charles E. Stillwell, William L. Michaels, and Marvin D. Grosslein, NOAA Technical Memorandum NMFS-NE-155 (2000)
6Food Web Relationships of Northern Puget Sound and the Strait of Juan de Fuca : a Synthesis of the Available Knowledge, Charles A. Simenstad, Bruce S. Miller, Carl F. Nyblade, Kathleen Thornburgh, and Lewis J. Bledsoe, EPA-600 7-29-259 September 1979
7Szoboszlai AI, Thayer JA, Wood SA, Sydeman WJ, Koehn LE (2015) Forage species in predator diets: synthesis of data from the California Current. Ecological Informatics 29(1): 45-56. Szoboszlai AI, Thayer JA, Wood SA, Sydeman WJ, Koehn LE (2015) Data from: Forage species in predator diets: synthesis of data from the California Current. Dryad Digital Repository.
8 Steimle FW, Pikanowski RA, McMillan DG, Zetlin CA, Wilk SJ. 2000. Demersal Fish and American Lobster Diets in the Lower Hudson - Raritan Estuary. US Dep Commer, NOAA Tech Memo NMFS NE 161; 106 p.
9Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License