Animalia > Chordata > Actinopterygii > Gadiformes > Gadidae > Microgadus > Microgadus proximus
 

Microgadus proximus (Tommy cod; Pacific tomcod)

Synonyms: Gadus californicus; Gadus proximus; Morrhua californica; Morrhua proxima
Language: Alutiiq; Danish; French; German; Mandarin Chinese; Polish; Russian; Salish; Swedish; Tsimshian

Wikipedia Abstract

Microgadus proximus, also commonly known as Pacific tomcod, is a type of cod fish found in North American coastal waters from the southeastern Bering Sea to central California. This species can reach a length of 30.5 cm (12.0 in). Their diet of the Pacific tomcod includes anchovies, shrimp, worms, and other small marine invertebrates. Pacific tomcod are occasionally taken by recreational anglers. This is usually incidental to fishing for other species of fish as they are relatively small in size.
View Wikipedia Record: Microgadus proximus

Attributes

Migration [1]  Oceanodromous

Protected Areas

Name IUCN Category Area acres Location Species Website Climate Land Use
Golden Gate National Recreation Area V 26135 California, United States
Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve II 366714 British Columbia, Canada
Pacific Rim National Park Reserve II 137900 British Columbia, Canada

Predators

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Echinorhynchus gadi[7]
Gyrodactylus californiensis[3]
Gyrodactylus cranei[3]
Gyrodactylus elongatus[3]

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

    Maps
Institution Infraspecies / Breed 
Aquarium du Quebec

Distribution

Alaska (USA); California Current; Canada; Eastern Pacific: southeastern Bering Sea to central California, USA.; Gulf of Alaska; Pacific Ocean; Pacific, Eastern Central; Pacific, Northeast; USA (contiguous states);

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Riede, Klaus (2004) Global Register of Migratory Species - from Global to Regional Scales. Final Report of the R&D-Projekt 808 05 081. 330 pages + CD-ROM
2Szoboszlai AI, Thayer JA, Wood SA, Sydeman WJ, Koehn LE (2015) Forage species in predator diets: synthesis of data from the California Current. Ecological Informatics 29(1): 45-56. Szoboszlai AI, Thayer JA, Wood SA, Sydeman WJ, Koehn LE (2015) Data from: Forage species in predator diets: synthesis of data from the California Current. Dryad Digital Repository.
3Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
4Food Web Relationships of Northern Puget Sound and the Strait of Juan de Fuca : a Synthesis of the Available Knowledge, Charles A. Simenstad, Bruce S. Miller, Carl F. Nyblade, Kathleen Thornburgh, and Lewis J. Bledsoe, EPA-600 7-29-259 September 1979
5del Hoyo, J., Elliott, A., Sargatal, J., Christie, D.A. & de Juana, E. (eds.). Handbook of the Birds of the World Alive. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.
6Feeding Habits of the Dungeness Crab Cancer magister as Determined by the Index of Relative Importance, B. G. Stevens, D. A. Armstrong and R. Cusimano, Marine Biology 72, 135-145 (1982)
7Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
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