Animalia > Chordata > Actinopterygii > Perciformes > Pomacanthidae > Pomacanthus > Pomacanthus arcuatus
 

Pomacanthus arcuatus (Pot cover; Grey angelfish; Gray angelfish; Angelfish)

Synonyms:
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Wikipedia Abstract

The gray angelfish, grey angelfish or black angelfish (Pomacanthus arcuatus) is a large angelfish of the family Pomacanthidae, found in the western Atlantic from New England to the vicinity of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and also the Bahamas, the Gulf of Mexico, and the Caribbean, including the Antilles, at depths of between 2 and 30 m. Length is up to 60 cm. It weighs about 2.0 kg. It feeds mainly on sponges, it is usually found in warm water, in coral reefs, and in oceans.
View Wikipedia Record: Pomacanthus arcuatus

Protected Areas

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Carcharhinus perezii (Caribbean reef shark)[1]

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Distribution

Anguilla; Antigua and Barbuda; Aruba; Atlantic Ocean; Atlantic, Northwest; Atlantic, Southwest; Atlantic, Western Central; Bahamas; Barbados; Belize; Bermuda; Brazil; Caribbean Sea; Cayman Islands; Celestún Biosphere Reserve; Colombia; Cuba; Curaçao Island; Discovery Bay; Dominica; Dominican Republic; East Brazil Shelf; French Guiana; Grenada; Guatemala; Gulf of Mexico; Guyana; Haiti; Honduras; Jamaica; Lutao Island; Martinique; Mexico; Montserrat; Netherlands Antilles; Nicaragua; North Brazil Shelf; Northeast U.S. Continental Shelf; Pacific, Northwest; Puerto Rico; Saint Kitts and Nevis; Saint Lucia; Saint Vincent & the Grenadines; South Brazil Shelf; Southeast U.S. Continental Shelf; Suriname; Taiwan; Trinidad and Tobago; Turks and Caicos Is.; US Virgin Islands; USA (contiguous states); Venezuela; Virgin Islands (UK); Western Atlantic: New England, USA to the vicinity of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, including the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean (Ref. 26938).;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
2The feeding ecology of three species of Caribbean angelfishes (family Pomacanthidae), Thomas F. Hourigan, Frank G. Stanton, Phillip J. Motta, Christopher D. Kelley & Bruce Carlson, Environmental Biology of Fishes Vol. 24. No. 2. pp. 105-116. 1989
3Sponge-feeding fishes of the West Indies, J. E. Randall and W. D. Hartman, Marine Biol. 1, 216-225 (1968)
4Food Habits of Reef Fishes of the West Indies, John E. Randall, Stud. Trop. Oceanogr. 5, 665–847 (1967)
5Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
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