Animalia > Chordata > Actinopterygii > Perciformes > Gobiidae > Pomatoschistus > Pomatoschistus minutus
 

Pomatoschistus minutus (freckled goby; Sand goby; Common goby; Goby)

Synonyms:
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Wikipedia Abstract

The sand goby (Pomatoschistus minutus), also known as a polewig or pollybait, is a species of ray-finned fish native to marine and brackish waters European waters from the Baltic Sea through the Mediterranean Sea and into the Black Sea where it occurs in sandy or muddy areas of inshore waters at depths of from 4 to 200 metres (13 to 656 ft). This species can reach a length of 11 centimetres (4.3 in) TL. This species is sometimes kept in public aquariums. The sand goby is of a sandy colour, with darker markings on the sides and a creamy-white underside. In the breeding season the male fish has blue spot at the rear of the first dorsal fin, ringed with white. The fish has a slender body, and the head is about a quarter of the total length.
View Wikipedia Record: Pomatoschistus minutus

Attributes

Female Maturity [1]  1 year
Male Maturity [3]  1 year
Maximum Longevity [1]  3 years
Migration [2]  Oceanodromous

Ecoregions

Name Countries Ecozone Biome Species Report Climate Land
Use
Cantabric Coast - Languedoc France, Spain Palearctic Temperate Coastal Rivers    
Central & Western Europe Austria, Belgium, Byelarus, Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Germany, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Poland, Russia, Slovakia, Switzerland, Ukraine, United Kingdom Palearctic Temperate Floodplain River and Wetlands    
Northern Baltic Drainages Denmark, Finland, Norway, Russia, Sweden Palearctic Polar Freshwaters    

Protected Areas

Ecosystems

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Providers

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

    Maps
Institution Infraspecies / Breed 
London Aquarium
Oresundsakvariet (Oresund Aquarium)
Rotterdam Zoo
Universeum Science Center
Zoological Society of London

Distribution

Aegean Sea; Albania; Algeria; Atlantic Ocean; Atlantic, Northeast; Baltic Sea; Belgium; Black Sea; Bosnia and Herzegovina; Bulgaria; Cantabrian Sea; Celtic-Biscay Shelf; Croatia; Denmark; Eastern Atlantic: from Norway to Spain (Ref. 51442); also Mediterranean Sea (Ref. 51442) and Black Sea, but probably not throughout. <i>Pomatoschistus minutus elongatus</i> exists in the Mediterranean and the Black Sea.; England and Wales (UK); Estonia; Faroe Plateau; Finland; France; Galician Shelf; Germany, Fed. Rep.; Greece; Iberian Coastal; Ireland; Isle of Man; Italy; Latvia; Libyan Arab Jamahiriya; Lithuania; Malta; Mediterranean Sea; Mediterranean and Black Sea; Morocco; Netherlands; North Sea; Northern Ireland; Norway; Norwegian Sea; Poland; Portugal; Russian Federation; Scotland (UK); Sea of Azov; Sea of Marmara; Serbia and Montenegro; Slovenia; Spain; Sweden; Tunisia; Turkey; Ukraine; United Kingdom;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Frimpong, E.A., and P. L. Angermeier. 2009. FishTraits: a database of ecological and life-history traits of freshwater fishes of the United States. Fisheries 34:487-495.
2Riede, Klaus (2004) Global Register of Migratory Species - from Global to Regional Scales. Final Report of the R&D-Projekt 808 05 081. 330 pages + CD-ROM
3de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
4Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
5The food of Pomatoschistus minutus (Pisces, Gobiidae) in Belgian coastal waters, and a comparison with the food of its potential competitor P. lozanoi, O. Hamerlynck and A. Cattrusse, Journal of Fish Biology (1994) 44, 753-771
6Energy flow of a boreal intertidal ecosystem, the Sylt-Rømø Bight, Dan Baird, Harald Asmus, Ragnhild Asmus, Mar Ecol Prog Ser 279: 45–61, 2004
7Trophodynamics in a Shallow Lagoon off Northwestern Europe (Culbin Sands, Moray Firth): Spatial and Temporal Variability of Epibenthic Communities, Their Diets, and Consumption Efficiency, Vanda Mariyam Mendonça, David George Raffaelli, Peter R. Boyle, and Chas Emes, Zoological Studies 48(2): 196-214 (2009)
8The mysid-feeding guild of demersal fishes in the brackish zone of the Westerschelde estuary, K. Hostens and J. Mees, Journal of Fish Biology (1999) 55, 704-719
9Dietary composition and the potential of food competition between 0-group cod (Gadus morhua L.) and some other fish species in the littoral zone, Karen Fjøsne and Jakob Gjøsæter, ICES Journal of Marine Science, 53: 757–770. 1996
10PRELIMINARY REPORT FROM A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF THE DIET OF FOUR GADOID FISHES IN A FJORD OF WESTERN NORWAY, A.G. Vea Salvanes, International Council for the Exploration of the Sea, C.M. 1986/G: 71, Demersal Fish Committee
11CephBase - Cephalopod (Octopus, Squid, Cuttlefish and Nautilus) Database
12Feeding ecology of the velvet swimming crab Necora puber in mussel raft areas of the Ria de Arousa (Galicia,NW Spain), Juan Freire, Eduardo González-Gurriarán, Mar. Ecol. Prog. Ser. 119: 139-154, 1995
13Diet comparison of four ray species (Raja clavata, Raja brachyura, Raja montagui and Leucoraja naevus) caught along the Portuguese continental shelf, Inês Farias, Ivone Figueiredo, Teresa Moura, Leonel Serrano Gordo, Ana Neves and Bárbara Serra-Pereira, Aquat. Living Resour. 19, 105–114 (2006)
14Ontogenetic dietary shift and feeding strategy of Raja undulata Lacepe&#768;de, 1802 (Chondrichthyes: Rajidae) on the Portuguese continental shelf, Teresa Moura, Ivone FigueIredo, Inês Farias, Bárbara Serra-Pereira, Ana Neves, Maria de Fátima Borges and Leonel Serrano Gordo, Scientia Marina 72(2) June 2008, 311-318
15Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Protected Areas provided by GBIF Global Biodiversity Information Facility
Biological Inventories of the World's Protected Areas in cooperation between the Information Center for the Environment at the University of California, Davis and numerous collaborators.
Natura 2000, UK data: © Crown copyright and database right [2010] All rights reserved. Ordnance Survey Licence number 100017955
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