Animalia > Chordata > Actinopterygii > Cypriniformes > Cyprinidae > Semotilus > Semotilus atromaculatus
 

Semotilus atromaculatus (Horned dace; Creek chub; Chub)

Synonyms:
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Wikipedia Abstract

Semotilus atromaculatus, known as the creek chub or the common creek chub, is a small minnow, a freshwater fish found in the eastern US and Canada. Differing in size and color depending on origin of development, the creek chub can usually be defined by a dark brown body with a white lateral line spanning horizontally across the body. It lives primarily within streams and rivers. Creek Chubs attain lengths of 2-6 inches with larger specimens of up to 12 inches possible. The genus name Semotilus derives from the Greek word sema (also known as dorsal fin), and atromaculatus comes from the Latin word "black spots".
View Wikipedia Record: Semotilus atromaculatus

Attributes

Adult Length [1]  12 inches (30 cm)
Brood Dispersal [1]  Hidden
Brood Egg Substrate [1]  Lithophils (gravel-sand)
Brood Guarder [1]  No
Litter Size [1]  50
Maximum Longevity [1]  8 years
Diet [2]  Omnivore, Planktivore
Female Maturity [1]  3 years
Male Maturity [3]  3 years

Ecoregions

Name Countries Ecozone Biome Species Report Climate Land
Use
Colorado Mexico, United States Nearctic Xeric Freshwaters and Endorheic Basins    

Protected Areas

Ecosystems

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Providers

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

America, North - Inland waters; Canada; Great Lakes; Mississippi; Missouri; Nearctic; North America: most of eastern USA and southeastern Canada in Atlantic, Great Lakes, Hudson Bay, Mississippi and Gulf basins as far as Manitoba, Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, Oklahoma, and Texas, but absent from southern Georgia and peninsular Florida; upp; North America: most of eastern USA and southeastern Canada in Atlantic, Great Lakes, Hudson Bay, Mississippi and Gulf basins as far as Manitoba, Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, Oklahoma, and Texas, but absent from southern Georgia and peninsular Florida; upper Pecos and Canadian River systems, New Mexico.; USA (contiguous states);

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Frimpong, E.A., and P. L. Angermeier. 2009. FishTraits: a database of ecological and life-history traits of freshwater fishes of the United States. Fisheries 34:487-495.
2Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
3de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
4Study of Northern Virginia Ecology
5Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
6Food Habits of the Banded Sculpin (Cottus carolinae) in Oklahoma With Reference to Predation on the Oklahoma Salamander (Eurycea tynerensis), Renn Tumlison and George R. Cline, Proc. Okla. Acad. Sci. 82:111-113(2002)
7Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License