Animalia > Chordata > Actinopterygii > Myctophiformes > Myctophidae > Stenobrachius > Stenobrachius leucopsarus
 

Stenobrachius leucopsarus (Smallfin lanternfish; Northern lampfish)

Synonyms: Lampanictus leucopsaurus; Lampanyctus beringensis; Lampanyctus leucopsarus; Myctophum leucopsarum; Nannobrachium leucopsarum
Language: Japanese; Mandarin Chinese; Russian; Spanish

Wikipedia Abstract

The northern lampfish (Stenobrachius leucopsarus), also known as smallfin lanternfish is a small oceanic fish in the family Myctophidae. First described by husband and wife ichthyologists Carl H. and Rosa Smith Eigenmann in 1890, it is named for the numerous small round photophores that line the ventral surface of its head and body. Like most fish, it is oviparous; It feeds on plankton, and is eaten by numerous predators, including fish such as salmon and tuna and birds such as the red-legged kittiwake.
View Wikipedia Record: Stenobrachius leucopsarus

Attributes

Maximum Longevity [1]  8 years

Protected Areas

Name IUCN Category Area acres Location Species Website Climate Land Use
Aleutian Islands Biosphere Reserve 2720489 Alaska, United States    
Farallon National Wildlife Refuge IV 352 California, United States
Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve II 366714 British Columbia, Canada
Pacific Rim National Park Reserve II 137900 British Columbia, Canada

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Distribution

Alaska (USA); California Current; Canada; Cobb Seamount; East Bering Sea; Gulf of Alaska; Japan; Kuroshio Current; Mexico; North Pacific: Japan to Bering Sea and to northern Baja California, Mexico.; Pacific Ocean; Pacific, Eastern Central; Pacific, Northeast; Pacific, Northwest; Russian Federation; Sea of Japan; Sea of Okhotsk; USA (contiguous states); West Bering Sea;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Frimpong, E.A., and P. L. Angermeier. 2009. FishTraits: a database of ecological and life-history traits of freshwater fishes of the United States. Fisheries 34:487-495.
2Feeding habits of three dominant myctophid fishes, Diaphus theta, Stenobrachius leucopsarus and S. nannochir, in the subarctic and transitional waters of the western North Pacific, Masatoshi Moku, Kouichi Kawaguchi, Hikaru Watanabe, Akinori Ohno, Mar Ecol Prog Ser 207: 129–140, 2000
3Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
4The Feeding Habits of Three Species of Lanternfishes (Family Myctophidae) off Oregon, USA, H. R. Tyler, Jr. and W. G. Pearcy, Marine Biology 32, 7-11 (1975)
5Yang, M-S. 2011. Diet of nineteen mesopelagic fishes in the Gulf of Alaska. U.S. Dep. Commer., NOAA Tech. Memo. NMFS-AFSC-229, 67 p.
6THE VERTICAL DISTRIBUTION AND FEEDING HABITS OF TWO COMMON MIDWATER FISHES (LEUROGLOSSUS STILBIUS AND STENOBRACHIUS LEUCOPSARUS) OFF SANTA BARBARA, GREGOR M. CAILLIET, ALFRED W. EBELING, CalCOFl Rep., Vol. 31, 1990, p. 106-123
7Diet and Ecomorphology of the Sandpaper Skate, Bathyraja kincaidii (Garman, 1908) from the Eastern North Pacific, Christopher Scott Rinewalt, Masters Thesis, California State University, Monterey Bay (2007)
8The Diets and Feeding Habits of Some Deep-Water Benthic Skates (Rajidae) in the Pacific Waters Off the Northern Kuril Islands and Southeastern Kamchatka, Alexei M. Orlov, Alaska Fishery Research Bulletin 5(1):1–17. 1998
9PREDATORY INTERACTIONS AND NICHE OVERLAP BETWEEN MAKO SHARK, ISURUS OXYRINCHUS, AND JUMBO SQUID, DOSIDICUS GIGAS, IN THE CALIFORNIA CURRENT, RUSS VETTER, SUZANNE KOHIN, ANTONELLA PRETI, SAM MCCLATCHIE AND HEIDI DEWAR, CalCOFI Rep., Vol. 49, 2008
10Szoboszlai AI, Thayer JA, Wood SA, Sydeman WJ, Koehn LE (2015) Forage species in predator diets: synthesis of data from the California Current. Ecological Informatics 29(1): 45-56. Szoboszlai AI, Thayer JA, Wood SA, Sydeman WJ, Koehn LE (2015) Data from: Forage species in predator diets: synthesis of data from the California Current. Dryad Digital Repository.
11Food habits of the longnose skate, Raja rhina (Jordan and Gilbert, 1880), in central California waters, Heather J. Robinson, Gregor M. Cailliet, David A. Ebert, Environ Biol Fish (2007) 80:165–179
12del Hoyo, J., Elliott, A., Sargatal, J., Christie, D.A. & de Juana, E. (eds.). Handbook of the Birds of the World Alive. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.
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