Animalia > Chordata > Actinopterygii > Cyprinodontiformes > Fundulidae > Fundulus > Fundulus heteroclitus
 

Fundulus heteroclitus (mummichog)

Synonyms:

Wikipedia Abstract

The mummichog (Fundulus heteroclitus) is a small killifish found along the Atlantic coast of the United States and Canada. Also known as mummies, gudgeons, and mud minnows, these fish inhabit brackish and coastal waters including estuaries and salt marshes. The species is noted for its hardiness and ability to tolerate highly variable salinity, temperature fluctuations from 6 to 35 °C (43 to 95 °F), very low oxygen levels (down to 1 mg/L), and heavily polluted ecosystems. As a result, the mummichog is a popular research subject in embryological, physiological, and toxicological studies. It is also the first fish ever sent to space, aboard Skylab in 1973.
View Wikipedia Record: Fundulus heteroclitus

Attributes

Adult Length [1]  6 inches (15 cm)
Brood Dispersal [1]  In the open
Brood Egg Substrate [1]  Phyto-lithophils
Brood Guarder [1]  No
Litter Size [1]  800
Maximum Longevity [1]  4 years
Diet [2]  Omnivore, Detritivore
Female Maturity [1]  1 year

Ecoregions

Name Countries Ecozone Biome Species Report Climate Land
Use
Northeast US & Southeast Canada Atlantic Drainages Canada, United States Nearctic Temperate Coastal Rivers    

Protected Areas

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Distribution

America, North - Inland waters; Asia - Inland waters; Atlantic Ocean; Atlantic, Northwest; Canada; Nearctic; Philippines; USA (contiguous states);

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Frimpong, E.A., and P. L. Angermeier. 2009. FishTraits: a database of ecological and life-history traits of freshwater fishes of the United States. Fisheries 34:487-495.
2Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
3VII. FOOD HABITS OF THE MUMMICHOG (Fundulus heteroclitus), Frank W. Steimle, Jr., NOAA Technical Memorandum NMFS-NE-167, 2001 p. 101-109
4The role of small fish species in eelgrass food webs of the Baltic Sea, Dissertation zur Erlangung des Doktorgrades der Mathematisch-Naturwissenschaftlichen Fakultät der Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Ivo Christian Bobsien, 2006
5Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
6Ontogenetic Shifts in the Diet of Gag, Mycteroperca microlepis, (Goode and Bean), (Pisces: Serranidae), Michael D. Mullaney, Jr., Proceedings of the 43rd Gulf and Caribbean Fisheries Institute, pp. 432-445 (1994)
7 Steimle FW, Pikanowski RA, McMillan DG, Zetlin CA, Wilk SJ. 2000. Demersal Fish and American Lobster Diets in the Lower Hudson - Raritan Estuary. US Dep Commer, NOAA Tech Memo NMFS NE 161; 106 p.
8Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Protected Areas provided by Biological Inventories of the World's Protected Areas in cooperation between the Information Center for the Environment at the University of California, Davis and numerous collaborators.
Natura 2000, UK data: © Crown copyright and database right [2010] All rights reserved. Ordnance Survey Licence number 100017955
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License