Animalia > Chordata > Actinopterygii > Siluriformes > Ictaluridae > Ameiurus > Ameiurus nebulosus
 

Ameiurus nebulosus (Brown bullhead; Northern brown bullhead; Mudcat; Minister; Marbled bullhead; Hornpout; Horned pout; Common catfish; Common bullhead; Catfish; Bullhead; Brown catfish)

Synonyms:
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Wikipedia Abstract

The brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus) is a fish of the Ictaluridae family that is widely distributed in North America. It is a species of bullhead catfish and is similar to the black bullhead (Ameiurus melas) and yellow bullhead (Ameiurus natalis). It was originally described as Pimelodus nebulosus by Charles Alexandre Lesueur in 1819, and is also referred to as Ictalurus nebulosus. The brown bullhead is also widely known as the "mud pout," "horned pout," "hornpout," or simply "mud cat," along with the other bullhead species.
View Wikipedia Record: Ameiurus nebulosus

Invasive Species

Ameiurus nebulosus, the brown bullhead, is a species of catfish native to North America and introduced to a number of other countries around the world as a game fish. It is a hardy species that can tolerate a wide range of environmental conditions, including water pollution, allowing it to successfully establish outside of its native range. Some concern has been raised over its invasive potential, but there is a lack of information on its effects.
View ISSG Record: Ameiurus nebulosus

Attributes

Adult Length [1]  22 inches (55 cm)
Brood Dispersal [1]  In a nest
Brood Egg Substrate [1]  Speleophils (cavity generalist)
Brood Guarder [1]  Yes
Litter Size [1]  13,000
Maximum Longevity [1]  11 years
Diet [2]  Omnivore, Planktivore, Detritivore
Female Maturity [1]  2 years 6 months

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Prey / Diet

Predators

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

America, North - Inland waters; America, South - Inland waters; Asia - Inland waters; Australian; Austria; Belarus; Belgium; Bulgaria; Canada; Chile; China; Columbia; Czech Republic; Danube; Denmark; Estonia; Euphrates; Europe - Inland waters; Finland; France; Fraser; Germany, Fed. Rep.; Great Lakes; Hungary; Iran (Islamic Rep. of); Ireland; Italy; Mississippi; Nearctic; Nelson-Saskatchewan; Neotropical; Netherlands; New Zealand; North America: Atlantic and Gulf Slope drainages from Nova Scotia and New Brunswick in Canada to Mobile Bay in Alabama in USA, and St. Lawrence-Great Lakes, Hudson Bay and Mississippi River basins from Quebec west to Saskatchewan in Canada and south to L; North America: Atlantic and Gulf Slope drainages from Nova Scotia and New Brunswick in Canada to Mobile Bay in Alabama in USA, and St. Lawrence-Great Lakes, Hudson Bay and Mississippi River basins from Quebec west to Saskatchewan in Canada and south to Louisiana, USA. Introduced into several countries. Several countries report adverse ecological impact after introduction. Asia: Iran and Turkey (Ref. 39702).; Norway; Oceania - Inland waters; Palearctic; Poland; Puerto Rico; Romania; Russian Federation; Serbia and Montenegro; Slovakia; Spain; St. Lawrence; Switzerland; Tigris; Turkey; USA (contiguous states); Ukraine; United Kingdom;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Frimpong, E.A., and P. L. Angermeier. 2009. FishTraits: a database of ecological and life-history traits of freshwater fishes of the United States. Fisheries 34:487-495.
2Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
3Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
4Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License