Animalia > Chordata > Actinopterygii > Perciformes > Centrarchidae > Lepomis > Lepomis microlophus
 

Lepomis microlophus (Redear sunfish; Redear)

Synonyms: Pomotis microlophus
Language: Danish; Mandarin Chinese; Spanish

Wikipedia Abstract

The redear sunfish (Lepomis microlophus, also known as the shellcracker, Georgia bream, cherry gill, chinquapin, improved bream, rouge ear sunfish and sun perch) is freshwater fish native to the southeastern United States. Since it is a popular sport fish, it has been introduced to bodies of water all over North America. It is known for its diet of mollusks and snails.
View Wikipedia Record: Lepomis microlophus

Attributes

Adult Length [1]  17 inches (43 cm)
Brood Dispersal [1]  In a nest
Brood Egg Substrate [1]  Polyphils
Brood Guarder [1]  Yes
Litter Size [1]  80,000
Maximum Longevity [1]  7 years
Adult Weight [2]  121 grams
Diet [3]  Omnivore, Planktivore, Detritivore
Female Maturity [1]  2 years

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Prey / Diet

Cyathura polita (Slender isopod)[4]
Mytilopsis leucophaeata (Brackish water mussel)[4]

Predators

Alligator mississippiensis (Alligator, Gator, American alligator, Florida alligator, Mississippi alligator, Louisiana alligator.)[4]
Egretta caerulea (Little Blue Heron)[5]
Mycteria americana (Wood Stork)[4]

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

Africa-Inland Waters; America, North - Inland waters; Mexico; Mississippi; Missouri; Morocco; Nearctic; Neotropical; North America: Savannah River in South Carolina to Nueces River in Texas, north in Mississippi River basin to southern Indiana and Illinois in the USA.; Palearctic; Panama; Puerto Rico; US Virgin Islands; USA (contiguous states);

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Frimpong, E.A., and P. L. Angermeier. 2009. FishTraits: a database of ecological and life-history traits of freshwater fishes of the United States. Fisheries 34:487-495.
2de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
3Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
4Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
5del Hoyo, J., Elliott, A., Sargatal, J., Christie, D.A. & de Juana, E. (eds.). Handbook of the Birds of the World Alive. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.
6Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License