Animalia > Arthropoda > Arachnida > Araneae > Pholcidae > Pholcus > Pholcus phalangioides
 

Pholcus phalangioides (Long-bodied cellar spider)

Synonyms: Pholcus communis; Pholcus dubiomaculatus; Pholcus lambertoni; Pholcus litoralis

Wikipedia Abstract

Pholcus phalangioides, known as the longbodied cellar spider or the skull spider due to its cephalothorax looking like a human skull, is a spider of the family Pholcidae. Females have a body length of about 9 mm; males are slightly smaller. Its legs are about 5 or 6 times the length of its body (reaching up to 7 cm of leg span in females). Its habit of living on the ceilings of rooms, caves, garages or cellars gives rise to one of its common names. They are considered beneficial in some parts of the world because they kill and eat other spiders, including species that can be considered a problem to humans such as hobo and redback spiders.
View Wikipedia Record: Pholcus phalangioides

Attributes

Diet [1]  Carnivore

Protected Areas

Name IUCN Category Area acres Location Species Website Climate Land Use
Berwickshire and North Northumberland Coast 160731 England/Scotland, United Kingdom  
Limestone Coast of South West Wales/ Arfordir Calchfaen de Orllewin Cymru 3940 Wales, United Kingdom  
Lundy 7573 England, United Kingdom  
Pen Llyn a`r Sarnau/ Lleyn Peninsula and the Sarnau 360832 Wales, United Kingdom
Salisbury Plain 52975 England, United Kingdom

Ecosystems

Prey / Diet

Mesembrina meridiana (Mid-day Fly)[2]

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Tachyglossus aculeatus (Short-beaked Echidna)[3]

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

    Maps
Institution Infraspecies / Breed 
Saint Louis Zoological Park

Distribution

Cosmopolitan; Madagascar;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
2Ecology of Commanster
3OBSERVATIONS ON THE DIET AND FEEDING HABITS OF THE SHORT-BEAKED ECHIDNA (TACHYGLOSSUS ACULEATUS) IN TASMANIA, Chris P. Spencer & Karen Richards, The Tasmanian Naturalist 131 (2009), p. 36-41
Protected Areas provided by GBIF Global Biodiversity Information Facility
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License