Animalia > Chordata > Actinopterygii > Esociformes > Esocidae > Esox > Esox lucius
 

Esox lucius (Jack; Northern pike; Pike; Pickerel; Jackfish; Great northern pike; Great northern pickerel; Great Lakes pike; Common pike; American pike; Wolf; Snake)

Synonyms:
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Wikipedia Abstract

The northern pike (Esox lucius), known simply as a pike in Britain, Ireland, most of Canada, and most parts of the United States (also called jackfish or simply "northern" in the U.S. Upper Midwest and in Manitoba), is a species of carnivorous fish of the genus Esox (the pikes). They are typical of brackish and fresh waters of the Northern Hemisphere (i.e. holarctic in distribution).
View Wikipedia Record: Esox lucius

Invasive Species

The northern pike, Esox lucius, is a predatory freshwater fish that is an opportunistic feeder. It is common in lakes, basins and rivers in the United States, Canada, central Asia, Siberia and many places in Europe. It is also present in the Aral, Arctic, Baltic, Barents, Black, Caspian, North and White seas and Atlantic basins. E. lucius exhibits genetic differentiation among its worldwide populations.
View ISSG Record: Esox lucius

Attributes

Adult Length [2]  4.92 feet (150 cm)
Brood Dispersal [2]  In the open
Brood Egg Substrate [2]  Phytophils
Brood Guarder [2]  No
Litter Size [2]  600,000
Maximum Longevity [2]  30 years
Migration [4]  Potamodromous
Water Biome [1]  Lakes and Ponds, Rivers and Streams
Adult Weight [3]  34.436 lbs (15.62 kg)
Diet [1]  Carnivore
Female Maturity [2]  3 years
Male Maturity [3]  2 years 5 months

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

+ Click for partial list (100)Full list (155)

Emblem of

North Dakota

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

Africa-Inland Waters; Alaska (USA); Algeria; America, North - Inland waters; Amudar'ya; Armenia; Asia - Inland waters; Atlantic Ocean; Atlantic, Northeast; Azerbaijan; Azores Islands; Baltic Sea; Belgium; Bosnia and Herzegovina; Bulgaria; Canada; Caspian Sea; China; Circumpolar in fresh water. North America: Atlantic, Arctic, Pacific, Great Lakes and Mississippi River basins from Labrador to Alaska and south to Pennsylvania, Missouri and Nebraska, USA (Ref. 5723). Eurasia: Caspian, Black, Baltic, White, Barents, Arctic, North and Aral Seas and Atlantic basins, southwest to Adour drainage; Mediterranean basin in Rhône drainage and northern Italy. Widely distributed in central Asia and Siberia easward to Anadyr drainage (Bering Sea basin). Historically absent from Iberian Peninsula, Mediterranean France, central Italy, southern and western Greece, eastern Adriatic basin, Iceland, western Norway and northern Scotland. Widely introduced and translocated throughout Europe (Ref. 59043). Several countries report adverse ecological impact after introduction (Ref. 1739).; Circumpolar in fresh water. North America: Atlantic, Arctic, Pacific, Great Lakes and Mississippi River basins from Labrador to Alaska and south to Pennsylvania, Missouri and Nebraska, USA. Eurasia: France to eastern Siberia, south to northern Italy. ; Circumpolar in fresh water. North America: Atlantic, Arctic, Pacific, Great Lakes and Mississippi River basins from Labrador to Alaska and south to Pennsylvania, Missouri and Nebraska, USA. Eurasia: France to eastern Siberia, south to northern Italy. Absent from northern Scotland. Introduced into other countries. Several countries report adverse ecological impact after introduction.; Croatia; Czech Republic; Danube; Denmark; Don; Elbe; Erqishi River; Estonia; Ethiopia; Ethiopian; Europe - Inland waters; Finland; France; Georgia; Germany, Fed. Rep.; Great Lakes; Greece; Hungary; Iberian Coastal; Iran (Islamic Rep. of); Ireland; Italy; Kamchatka; Kazakhstan; Kuban River; Lake Baikal; Latvia; Lithuania; Luxembourg; Macedonia, Fmr Yug Rp of; Mackenzie; Madagascar; Mississippi; Missouri; Moldova, Republic of; Monaco; Mongolia; Morocco; Nearctic; Nelson-Saskatchewan; Netherlands; Norway; Norwegian Sea; Ob-Irtysh; Ombrone; Onega River; Palearctic; Poland; Portugal; Rio Grande; Romania; Russian Federation; Serbia and Montenegro; Slovakia; Slovenia; Spain; Sweden; Switzerland; Tigris; Tunisia; Turkey; Turkmenistan; USA (contiguous states); Uganda; Ukraine; United Kingdom; Uzbekistan; Volga; Yukon;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
2Frimpong, E.A., and P. L. Angermeier. 2009. FishTraits: a database of ecological and life-history traits of freshwater fishes of the United States. Fisheries 34:487-495.
3de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
4Grenouillet, G. & Schmidt-Kloiber., A.; 2006; Fish Indicator Database. Euro-limpacs project, Workpackage 7 - Indicators of ecosystem health, Task 4, www.freshwaterecology.info, version 5.0 (accessed on July 3, 2012).
5Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
6A quantitative comparison between diet and body fatty acid composition in wild northern pike (Esox lucius L.), Karl Schwalme, Fish Physiology and Biochemistry vol. 10 no. 2 pp 91-98 (1992)
7Alaska Wildlife Notebook Series, Alaska Department of Fish and Game
8Treasurer, Jim (1998) Life-history strategies of pike in a high-altitude loch in Scotland. Freshwater Forum, 11, pp. 59-68.
9Reproductive parameters in relation to food supply in the whiskered tern (Chlidonias hybrida), Jean-Marc Paillisson, Sébastien Reeber, Alexandre Carpentier, Loïc Marion, J Ornithol (2007) 148:69–77
10del Hoyo, J., Elliott, A., Sargatal, J., Christie, D.A. & de Juana, E. (eds.). Handbook of the Birds of the World Alive. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.
11Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Protected Areas provided by Biological Inventories of the World's Protected Areas in cooperation between the Information Center for the Environment at the University of California, Davis and numerous collaborators.
Ramsar Sites Information Service
Natura 2000, UK data: © Crown copyright and database right [2010] All rights reserved. Ordnance Survey Licence number 100017955
GBIF Global Biodiversity Information Facility
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License