Animalia > Chordata > Actinopterygii > Perciformes > Gobiidae > Gobius > Gobius niger
 

Gobius niger (Black goby)

Synonyms:
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Wikipedia Abstract

The black goby (Gobius niger) is a species of ray-finned fish found in the Eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea and Black Sea. It inhabits estuaries, lagoons, and inshore water over seagrass and algae. It feeds on a variety of invertebrates and sometimes small fish. This species can also be found in the aquarium trade. This fish reaches a maximum length of 18 centimetres (7 in) TL. This fish's neck is scaled and both of its dorsal fins have a black spot on the front end.
View Wikipedia Record: Gobius niger

Attributes

Female Maturity [1]  9 months 22 days
Male Maturity [2]  9 months 22 days
Maximum Longevity [1]  5 years

Ecoregions

Name Countries Ecozone Biome Species Report Climate Land
Use
Central & Western Europe Austria, Belgium, Byelarus, Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Germany, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Poland, Russia, Slovakia, Switzerland, Ukraine, United Kingdom Palearctic Temperate Floodplain River and Wetlands    
Northern Baltic Drainages Denmark, Finland, Norway, Russia, Sweden Palearctic Polar Freshwaters    

Protected Areas

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

    Maps
Institution Infraspecies / Breed 
Artis Zoo
Budapest Zool.& Botanical Garden
Oceanario de Lisboa
Rotterdam Zoo
Universeum Science Center

Distribution

Eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea: throughout North Africa from Cape Blanc, Mauritania north and eastwards to the Suez Canal; also along the eastern Atlantic coast northwards to Trondheim (Norway) and Baltic Sea. Also known from the Black Sea (Ref. 4646).;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Frimpong, E.A., and P. L. Angermeier. 2009. FishTraits: a database of ecological and life-history traits of freshwater fishes of the United States. Fisheries 34:487-495.
2de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
3Dietary composition and the potential of food competition between 0-group cod (Gadus morhua L.) and some other fish species in the littoral zone, Karen Fjøsne and Jakob Gjøsæter, ICES Journal of Marine Science, 53: 757–770. 1996
4Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
5Feeding habits and trophic levels of Mediterranean fish, Konstantinos I. Stergiou & Vasiliki S. Karpouzi, Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries 11: 217–254, 2002
6Feeding behaviour and daily ration of the spotted flounder Citharus linguatula (Osteichthyes: Pleuronectiformes) in the central Tyrrhenian Sea, PAOLO CARPENTIERI, TIZIANA CANTARELLI, FRANCESCO COLLOCA, ALESSANDRO CRISCOLI and GIANDOMENICO ARDIZZONE, Scientia Marina 74(4) December 2010, 659-667
7Feeding ecology of Liocarcinus depurator (Decapoda: Portunidae) in the Ría de Arousa (Galicia, north-west Spain): effects of habitat, season and life history}, J. Freire, Marine Biology (1996) 126: 297-311
8Feeding ecology of the velvet swimming crab Necora puber in mussel raft areas of the Ria de Arousa (Galicia,NW Spain), Juan Freire, Eduardo González-Gurriarán, Mar. Ecol. Prog. Ser. 119: 139-154, 1995
9Ontogenetic dietary shift and feeding strategy of Raja undulata Lacepède, 1802 (Chondrichthyes: Rajidae) on the Portuguese continental shelf, Teresa Moura, Ivone FigueIredo, Inês Farias, Bárbara Serra-Pereira, Ana Neves, Maria de Fátima Borges and Leonel Serrano Gordo, Scientia Marina 72(2) June 2008, 311-318
10Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Protected Areas provided by GBIF Global Biodiversity Information Facility
Biological Inventories of the World's Protected Areas in cooperation between the Information Center for the Environment at the University of California, Davis and numerous collaborators.
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License