Animalia > Chordata > Actinopterygii > Scorpaeniformes > Sebastidae > Sebastes > Sebastes mentella
 

Sebastes mentella (Redfish; Ocean perch; Deepwater redfish; Beaked redfish; Atlantic ocean perch; Deepwater rosefish)

Synonyms: Sebastichthys mentella
Language: Danish; Faroese; French; Icelandic; Mandarin Chinese; Norwegian; Polish; Portuguese; Romanian; Russian; Spanish; Swedish

Wikipedia Abstract

The deepwater redfish (Sebastes mentella), also known as the beaked redfish, ocean perch, Atlantic redfish, Norway haddock, red perch, golden redfish, or hemdurgan, may reach a size of 55–70 centimetres (22–28 in), but is usually less than 45 centimetres (18 in). It lives in comparatively high concentrations in the North Atlantic, for example in the Irminger Sea where considerable numbers are fished. It occupies depths between 300 and 1,000 metres (980 and 3,280 ft) and is often pelagic, i.e. far off the bottom. The deep-sea redfish feeds on a variety of food organisms, for example small fishes. In contrast to most fishes that spawn unfertilised eggs, the deepwater redfish has internal fertilisation and spawns free-living larvae.
View Wikipedia Record: Sebastes mentella

Attributes

Female Maturity [1]  13 years
Male Maturity [3]  10 years
Maximum Longevity [1]  75 years
Migration [2]  Oceanodromous

Protected Areas

Name IUCN Category Area acres Location Species Website Climate Land Use
Saguenay - St. Lawrence Marine Park National Marine Conservation Area II 310822 Canada
Sirmilik National Park II 5475284 Canada

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Consumers

Distribution

Atlantic Ocean; Atlantic, Northeast; Atlantic, Northwest; Baffin Bay; Canada; East Greenland Shelf/Sea; Eastern Atlantic: Norwegian Sea from Lofoten Island northward to the western and northern coasts of Spitsbergen; southern part of the Barents Sea rarely to 35°E , on the Iceland-Faroes Ridge, Iceland and Greenland. Western Atlantic: Baffin Bay to Nova ; Eastern Atlantic: Norwegian Sea from Lofoten Island northward to the western and northern coasts of Spitsbergen; southern part of the Barents Sea rarely to 35°E , on the Iceland-Faroes Ridge, Iceland and Greenland. Western Atlantic: Baffin Bay to Nova Scotia in Canada (Ref. 7251).; Faeroe Islands; Faroe Plateau; Greenland; Iceland; Iceland Shelf/Sea; Newfoundland-Labrador Shelf; Norway; Norwegian Sea; Scotian Shelf; Svalbard and Jan Mayen; West Greenland Shelf;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Frimpong, E.A., and P. L. Angermeier. 2009. FishTraits: a database of ecological and life-history traits of freshwater fishes of the United States. Fisheries 34:487-495.
2Riede, Klaus (2004) Global Register of Migratory Species - from Global to Regional Scales. Final Report of the R&D-Projekt 808 05 081. 330 pages + CD-ROM
3de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
4Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
5Food and Feeding of Ocean Redfish (Sebastes mentella Travin) in the North Atlantic, Concepción González and Isabel Bruno, NAFO SCR Doc. 97/92 (1997)
6The role of capelin (Mallotus villosus) in the foodweb of the Barents Sea, A. V. Dolgov, ICES Journal of Marine Science, 59: 1034–1045. 2002
7McMeans, Bailey C., et al. "The role of Greenland sharks (Somniosus microcephalus) in an Arctic ecosystem: assessed via stable isotopes and fatty acids." Marine Biology 160.5 (2013): 1223+. Academic OneFile. Web. 14 July 2014.
8Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
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