Animalia > Chordata > Actinopterygii > Perciformes > Anarhichadidae > Anarhichas > Anarhichas lupus
 

Anarhichas lupus (Wolffish; Wolf-fish; Ocean whitefish; Cat-fish; Catfish; Atlantic wolffish; Sea-cat)

Synonyms:
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Wikipedia Abstract

The Atlantic wolffish (Anarhichas lupus), also known as the seawolf, Atlantic catfish, ocean catfish, devil fish, wolf eel (the common name for its Pacific relative), woof or sea cat, is a marine fish, the largest of the wolffish family Anarhichadidae. The numbers of the Atlantic wolffish are rapidly being depleted, most likely due to overfishing and bycatch, and is currently a Species of Concern according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Marine Fisheries Service.
View Wikipedia Record: Anarhichas lupus

Attributes

Migration [1]  Oceanodromous

Protected Areas

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

    Maps
Institution Infraspecies / Breed 
Aquarium du Quebec
Biodome de Montreal
Bristol Zoo Gardens
John G. Shedd Aquarium
Universeum Science Center

Distribution

Atlantic Ocean; Atlantic, Northeast; Atlantic, Northwest; Baltic Sea; Belgium; Canada; Celtic-Biscay Shelf; China; Denmark; East Greenland Shelf/Sea; England and Wales (UK); Faeroe Islands; Faroe Plateau; France; Germany, Fed. Rep.; Greenland; Iceland; Iceland Shelf/Sea; Ireland; Netherlands; Newfoundland-Labrador Shelf; North Sea; Northeast Atlantic: Spitsbergen southward to White Sea, Scandinavian coasts, North Sea, the British Isles, also Iceland and south-eastern coasts of Greenland. Northwest Atlantic: southern Labrador in Canada and western Greenland to Cape Cod in Massachu; Northeast Atlantic: Spitsbergen southward to White Sea, Scandinavian coasts, North Sea, the British Isles, also Iceland and south-eastern coasts of Greenland. Northwest Atlantic: southern Labrador in Canada and western Greenland to Cape Cod in Massachusetts, USA; rarely to New Jersey, USA (Ref. 7251). Elsewhere in the Baltic Sea (east to Rügen and Bornholm Islands), Bay of Biscay and northwestern Mediterranean (Gulf of Genoa) (Ref. 57932).; Northeast U.S. Continental Shelf; Northern Ireland; Norway; Norwegian Sea; Poland; Scotian Shelf; Scotland (UK); Svalbard and Jan Mayen; Sweden; USA (contiguous states); United Kingdom; West Greenland Shelf;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Riede, Klaus (2004) Global Register of Migratory Species - from Global to Regional Scales. Final Report of the R&D-Projekt 808 05 081. 330 pages + CD-ROM
2Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
3Aggregation of whelks, Buccinum undatum, near feeding predators: the role of reproductive requirements, Rémy Rochette, Françoise Tétreault and John H. Himmelman, ANIMAL BEHAVIOUR, 2001, 61, 31–41
4Food of Northwest Atlantic Fishes and Two Common Species of Squid, Ray E. Bowman, Charles E. Stillwell, William L. Michaels, and Marvin D. Grosslein, NOAA Technical Memorandum NMFS-NE-155 (2000)
5Feeding Habits of Fish Species Distributed on the Grand Bank, Concepción González1, Xabier Paz, Esther Román, and María Hermida, NAFO SCR Doc. 06/31, Serial No. N5251 (2006)
6Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Protected Areas provided by GBIF Global Biodiversity Information Facility
Biological Inventories of the World's Protected Areas in cooperation between the Information Center for the Environment at the University of California, Davis and numerous collaborators.
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License