Animalia > Chordata > Actinopterygii > Perciformes > Carangidae > Trachurus > Trachurus capensis
 

Trachurus capensis (Cape horse mackerel; Horse mackerel)

Synonyms: Selar tabulae; Trachurus trachurus capensis
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Wikipedia Abstract

The Cape horse mackerel (Trachurus capensis) is a mackerel-like species in the family Carangidae. Their maximum reported length is 60 cm, with a common length of 30 cm. Cape horse mackerel (Trachurus capensis) is a pelagic species, usually found to a depth of 300 m. They are mostly found over the continental shelf, often over sandy bottoms. The shoals rise to feed in surface waters at night, but can be found close to the bottom during the day. Horse mackerel are very abundant in South African and Namibian waters, though much of the catch is exported. Their stock status is uncertain, but expert opinion is that the stock is most likely underfished.
View Wikipedia Record: Trachurus capensis

Predators

Arctocephalus pusillus (Brown Fur Seal)[1]
Phoca vitulina (Harbor Seal)[1]
Thyrsites atun (snake mackerel)[2]

Consumers

Distribution

Angola; Atlantic Ocean; Atlantic, Eastern Central; Atlantic, Southeast; Benguela Current; Benin; Cameroon; Congo, Dem. Rep. of the; Congo, Republic of; Côte d'Ivoire; Eastern Atlantic: Gulf of Guinea to South Africa. Bianchi et. al. 1993 notes 'Smith-Vaniz (1992, pers. comm.) does not believe that <i>Trachurus capensis</i> is a valid species but admits that an adequate series of this species along the coast of Africa; Eastern Atlantic: Gulf of Guinea to South Africa. Bianchi et. al. 1993 notes 'Smith-Vaniz (1992, pers. comm.) does not believe that <i>Trachurus capensis</i> is a valid species but admits that an adequate series of this species along the coast of Africa are not available'.; Equatorial Guinea; Gabon; Gambia; Ghana; Guinea; Guinea Current; Guinea-Bissau; Liberia; Namibia; Nigeria; Sierra Leone; South Africa; Togo;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
2Life history of South African snoek, Thyrsites atun (Pisces: Gempylidae): a pelagic predator of the Benguela ecosystem, Griffiths, Marc H., Fishery Bulletin, Oct 2002, Volume: 100 Issue: 4
3Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
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