Animalia > Chordata > Actinopterygii > Perciformes > Nototheniidae > Trematomus > Trematomus bernacchii
 

Trematomus bernacchii (Emerald notothen; Emerald rockcod)

Synonyms: Notothenia bernacchii; Pagothenia bernacchii; Pseudotrematomus bernacchii; Trematomus bernachii
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Wikipedia Abstract

The emerald rockcod or emerald notothen (Trematomus bernacchii) is a commercially important species of cod icefish.
View Wikipedia Record: Trematomus bernacchii

Attributes

Female Maturity [1]  5 years 6 months
Male Maturity [2]  3 years 6 months
Maximum Longevity [1]  10 years

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

    Maps
Institution Infraspecies / Breed 
Acquario di Genova

Distribution

Antarctic; Atlantic Ocean; Atlantic, Antarctic; Elephant Island; Indian Ocean; Indian Ocean, Antarctic; Pacific Ocean; Pacific, Antarctic; Peter I Island; South Orkney Islands; South Shetland Islands; Southern Ocean: Peter Island, South Shetland, Elephant and South Orkney islands. Mac-Robertson, Queen Mary, Adelie Coasts, Weddell, Davis and Ross seas. East Antarctica from Queen Maud Land to Terre Adelie.;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Frimpong, E.A., and P. L. Angermeier. 2009. FishTraits: a database of ecological and life-history traits of freshwater fishes of the United States. Fisheries 34:487-495.
2de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
3Trophic ecology of the emerald notothen Trematomus bernacchii (Pisces, Nototheniidae) from Terra Nova Bay, Ross Sea, Antarctica, M. La Mesa, M. Dalú, M. Vacchi
4Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
5M. Vacchi, M. La Mesa and A. Castelli (1994). Diet of two coastal nototheniid fish from Terra Nova Bay, Ross Sea. Antarctic Science, 6, pp 61­65
6The role of notothenioid fish in the food web of the Ross Sea shelf waters: a review, M. La Mesa, J. T. Eastman, M. Vacchi, Polar Biol (2004) 27: 321–338
7Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
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