Animalia > Chordata > Actinopterygii > Salmoniformes > Salmonidae > Thymallus > Thymallus arcticus
 

Thymallus arcticus (Arctic grayling)

Synonyms:

Wikipedia Abstract

Arctic grayling (Thymallus arcticus) is a species of freshwater fish in the salmon family Salmonidae. T. arcticus is widespread throughout the Arctic and Pacific drainages in Canada, Alaska, and Siberia, as well as the upper Missouri River drainage in Montana. In the U.S. state of Arizona, an introduced population is found in the Lee Valley and other lakes in the White Mountains. They were also stocked at Toppings Lake by the Teton Range.
View Wikipedia Record: Thymallus arcticus

Attributes

Adult Length [1]  30 inches (76 cm)
Brood Dispersal [1]  In the open
Brood Egg Substrate [1]  Lithophils (rock-gravel)
Brood Guarder [1]  No
Litter Size [1]  15,905
Maximum Longevity [1]  18 years
Adult Weight [2]  4.636 lbs (2.103 kg)
Diet [3]  Carnivore
Female Maturity [1]  6 years

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Ecosystems

Prey / Diet

Brachymystax lenok (Manchurian trout)[4]
Cottus cognatus (Anadyr sculpin)[5]
Culiseta alaskaensis (Mosquito)[5]
Lithobates sylvaticus (Wood Frog)[5]
Oncorhynchus keta (Calico salmon)[4]

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Gavia pacifica (Pacific Loon)[6]
Haliaeetus leucocephalus (Bald Eagle)[5]
Lontra canadensis (northern river otter)[7]

Consumers

Range Map

Distribution

Asia - Inland waters; Europe - Inland waters; Lake Baikal; Mongolia; Palearctic; Russian Federation;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Frimpong, E.A., and P. L. Angermeier. 2009. FishTraits: a database of ecological and life-history traits of freshwater fishes of the United States. Fisheries 34:487-495.
2de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
3Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
4Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
5Making The Forest And Tundra Wildlife Connection
6del Hoyo, J., Elliott, A., Sargatal, J., Christie, D.A. & de Juana, E. (eds.). Handbook of the Birds of the World Alive. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.
7Exploring the Denali Food Web, ParkWise, National Park Service
8Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License