Animalia > Chordata > Actinopterygii > Salmoniformes > Salmonidae > Coregonus > Coregonus lavaretus
 

Coregonus lavaretus (Houting; Lake Chud whitefish; Lavaret; Baltic whitefish; Common whitefish; European whitefish; Pollan; Powan; Schelly; Whitefish)

Synonyms: Coregonus dispersus cognatus; Coregonus lavaretus lavaretus; Coregonus polcur brachymystax; Coregonus rondeletii; Salmo lavaretus
Language: Bulgarian; Czech; Danish; Dutch; Estonian; Finnish; French; Gaelic, Irish; German; Greek; Italian; Latvian; Lithuanian; Mandarin Chinese; Norwegian; Persian; Polish; Portuguese; Romanian; Russian; Slovak; Spanish; Swedish; Welsh

Wikipedia Abstract

Coregonus lavaretus is a species of freshwater whitefish, in the family Salmonidae. It is the type species of its genus Coregonus. There are widely different concepts about the delimitation of the species Coregonus lavaretus and about the number of species in the genus Coregonus in general.
View Wikipedia Record: Coregonus lavaretus

Attributes

Adult Length [1]  29 inches (73 cm)
Brood Dispersal [2]  In the open
Brood Egg Substrate [2]  Lithophils
Brood Guarder [2]  No
Maximum Longevity [1]  15 years
Migration [3]  Anadromous
Diet [3]  Carnivore (Invertebrates)
Female Maturity [1]  3 years

Ecoregions

Name Countries Ecozone Biome Species Report Climate Land
Use
Cantabric Coast - Languedoc France, Spain Palearctic Temperate Coastal Rivers    
Central & Western Europe Austria, Belgium, Byelarus, Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Germany, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Poland, Russia, Slovakia, Switzerland, Ukraine, United Kingdom Palearctic Temperate Floodplain River and Wetlands    
Northern Baltic Drainages Denmark, Finland, Norway, Russia, Sweden Palearctic Polar Freshwaters    

Protected Areas

Prey / Diet

Predators

Consumers

Range Map

Distribution

Armenia; Asia - Inland waters; Atlantic, Northeast; Austria; Baltic Sea; Belarus; Belgium; Black Sea; Bulgaria; Channel Islands; Czech Republic; Denmark; England and Wales (UK); Estonia; Europe - Inland waters; Europe: Native to Lake Bourget (France) and Geneva (Switzerland, France). Population of Lake Aiguebelette (France) apparently introduced, but a 'lavaret' had already been recorded from there in the 17th century (Ref. 59043). Other authors assume it to be a superspecies occurring in Great Britain and Alpine areas of Central Europe. Has been stocked into many other places in Europe outside its native range. There are many parallel and wrong scientific names for this species in use because of the problems in classifying the genus <i>Coregonus</i> (Ref. 7495). Appendix III of the Bern Convention (protected fauna). Asia: introduced to Iran (Ref. 39702).; Europe: usage of name restricted to Lakes Genève (now extinct), Bourget, and Aiguebelette in the river Rhône basin by designation of neotype from this area (Ref. 13696). Other authors assume it to be a superspecies occurring in Great Britain and Alpine ; Europe: usage of name restricted to Lakes Genève (now extinct), Bourget, and Aiguebelette in the river Rhône basin by designation of neotype from this area (Ref. 13696). Other authors assume it to be a superspecies occurring in Great Britain and Alpine areas of Central Europe. Has been stocked into many other places in Europe outside of its native range. There are many parallel and wrong scientific names for this species in use because of the problems in classifying the genus <i>Coregonus</i> (Ref. 7495). Appendix III of the Bern Convention (protected fauna). Asia: introduced to Iran (Ref. 39702).; Faeroe Islands; Finland; France; Germany, Fed. Rep.; Greece; Iran (Islamic Rep. of); Ireland; Isle of Man; Issyk-Kul Lake; Italy; Japan; Kazakhstan; Kyrgyzstan; Latvia; Lithuania; Mediterranean Sea; Mediterranean and Black Sea; Netherlands; Norway; Pacific, Northwest; Palearctic; Poland; Romania; Russian Federation; Scotland (UK); Serbia and Montenegro; Sevan; Slovakia; Svalbard and Jan Mayen; Sweden; Switzerland; Turkey; Ukraine; United Kingdom;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Frimpong, E.A., and P. L. Angermeier. 2009. FishTraits: a database of ecological and life-history traits of freshwater fishes of the United States. Fisheries 34:487-495.
2Grenouillet, G. & Schmidt-Kloiber., A.; 2006; Fish Indicator Database. Euro-limpacs project, Workpackage 7 - Indicators of ecosystem health, Task 4, www.freshwaterecology.info, version 5.0 (accessed on July 3, 2012).
3Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
4Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
5Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Protected Areas provided by Natura 2000, UK data: © Crown copyright and database right [2010] All rights reserved. Ordnance Survey Licence number 100017955
Biological Inventories of the World's Protected Areas in cooperation between the Information Center for the Environment at the University of California, Davis and numerous collaborators.
GBIF Global Biodiversity Information Facility
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License