Animalia > Arthropoda > Insecta > Lepidoptera > Papilionoidea > Pieridae > Pieris > Pieris rapae
 

Pieris rapae (imported cabbageworm)

Synonyms: Pieris brassciae var. crucivora; Pieris rapae flavescens

Wikipedia Abstract

Pieris rapae, the small white, is a small- to medium-sized butterfly species of the whites-and-yellows family Pieridae. It is also known as the small cabbage white and in New Zealand, simply as white butterfly. The names "cabbage butterfly" and "cabbage white" can also refer to the large white. The butterfly can be distinguished by the white color with small black dots on its wings. They are distinguished from the smaller size and lack of the black band at the tip of their forewings.
View Wikipedia Record: Pieris rapae

Attributes

Litter Size [1]  430
Wing Span [2]  1.732 inches (.044 m)

Protected Areas

Ecosystems

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

+ Click for partial list (57)Full list (348)

Predators

Providers

Pollinated by 
Sonchus asper[5]

Consumers

Distribution

Australia; Mongolia; ;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Body size, egg size, and their interspecific relationships with ecological and life history traits in butterflies (Lepidoptera: Papilionoidea, Hesperioidea), Enrique García-Barros, Biological Journal of the Linnean Society (2000), 70: 251–284
2BUTTERFLIES OF AUCKLAND, D.R. Cowley and J.M. Cowley, TANE 29, 1983, pp. 181-192
3Ecology of Commanster
4Biological Records Centre Database of Insects and their Food Plants
5Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
6New Zealand Institute for Plant & Food Research Plant-SyNZ™ database
7Study of Northern Virginia Ecology
8Species Interactions of Australia Database, Atlas of Living Australia, Version ala-csv-2012-11-19
9Predator-Prey Database for the family Asilidae (Hexapoda: Diptera) Prepared by Dr. Robert Lavigne, Professor Emeritus, University of Wyoming, USA and Dr. Jason Londt (Natal Museum, Pietermaritzburg)
10ABUNDANCE OF WASPS AND PREY CONSUMPTION OF PAPER WASPS (HYMENOPTERA, VESPIDAE: POLISTINAE) IN NORTHLAND, NEW ZEALAND, B. Kay Clapperton, New Zealand Journal of Ecology (1999) 23(1): 11-19
11Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
12Robertson, C. Flowers and insects lists of visitors of four hundred and fifty three flowers. 1929. The Science Press Printing Company Lancaster, PA.
13Kato, M., T. Makutani, T. Inoue, and T. Itino. 1990. Insect-flower relationship in the primary beech forest of Ashu, Kyoto: an overview of the flowering phenology and seasonal pattern of insect visits. Contr. Biol. Lab. Kyoto Univ. 27:309-375.
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