Animalia > Arthropoda > Arachnida > Araneae > Araneidae > Argiope > Argiope aurantia
 

Argiope aurantia (black-and-yellow argiope)

Wikipedia Abstract

The spider species Argiope aurantia is commonly known as the yellow garden spider, black and yellow garden spider, golden garden spider, writing spider, corn spider, or McKinley spider. It is common to the contiguous United States, Hawaii, southern Canada, Mexico, and Central America. They have distinctive yellow and black markings on their abdomens and a mostly white cephalothorax. Its scientific Latin name translates to "gilded silver-face" (the genus name Argiope meaning "silver-face", while the specific epithet aurantia means "gilded"). Males range from 5–9 mm (0.20–0.35 in) females from 19–28 mm (0.75–1.10 in). These spiders may bite if disturbed or harassed, but the venom is seemingly harmless to humans.
View Wikipedia Record: Argiope aurantia

Attributes

Diet [1]  Carnivore
Hibernates [1]  Yes
Nocturnal [1]  Yes

Protected Areas

Name IUCN Category Area acres Location Species Website Climate Land Use
Edwin S. George Reserve 1297 Michigan, United States

Ecosystems

Prey / Diet

Predators

Providers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

    Maps
Institution Infraspecies / Breed 
Disney's Animal Kingdom

Distribution

Canada to Costa Rica;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
2Study of Northern Virginia Ecology
Protected Areas provided by Edwin S. George Reserve, University of Michigan, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License