Plantae > Tracheophyta > Magnoliopsida > Myrtales > Myrtaceae > Eucalyptus > Eucalyptus lamprocalyx
 

Eucalyptus lamprocalyx (eurabbie; Tasmanian bluegum)

Synonyms: Eucalyptus lamprocarpa; Eucalyptus perfoliata

Attributes

Air Quality Improvement [1]  Medium
Allergen Potential [1]  Medium-High
Carbon Capture [1]  Medium-Low
Screening - Summer [2]  Moderate
Screening - Winter [2]  Moderate
Shade Percentage [1]  83 %
Temperature Reduction [1]  Medium-Low
Wind Reduction [1]  High
Bloom Period [2]  Fall
Drought Tolerance [2]  Low
Edible [3]  May be edible. See the Plants For A Future link below for details.
Fire Tolerance [2]  High
Flower Type [3]  Hermaphrodite
Frost Free Days [2]  8 months
Fruit/Seed Abundance [2]  High
Fruit/Seed Begin [2]  Winter
Fruit/Seed End [2]  Fall
Growth Form [2]  Single Stem
Growth Period [2]  Spring, Fall, Winter
Growth Rate [2]  Rapid
Hazards [3]  Citronellal, an essential oil found in most Eucalyptus species is reported to be mutagenic when used in isolation; In large doses, oil of eucalyptus, like so many essential oils has caused fatalities from intestinal irritation; Death is reported from ingestion of 4 - 24 ml of essential oils, but recoveries are also reported for the same amount; Symptoms include gastroenteric burning and irritation, nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, oxygen deficiency, ,weakness, dizziness, stupor, difficult respiration, delirium, paralysis, convulsions, and death, usually due to respiratory failure; The plant is reported to cause contact dermatitis. Sensitive persons may develop urticaria from handling the foliage and other parts of the plant;
Janka Hardness [4]  2470 lbf (1120 kgf) Very Hard
Leaf Type [3]  Evergreen
Lifespan [2]  Perennial
Pollinators [3]  Bees
Propagation [2]  Bare Root, Container, Seed
Root Depth [2]  24 inches (61 cm)
Scent [3]  The bruised leaves emit a powerful balsamic smell.
Seed Spread Rate [2]  Moderate
Seed Vigor [2]  High
Seeds Per [2]  304325 / lb (670923 / kg)
Shape/Orientation [2]  Erect
Specific Gravity [5]  0.722
Structure [3]  Tree
Usage [3]  The leaves and the essential oil in them are used as an insect repellent; The trees can also be planted in wet areas where mosquitoes abound. The ground will be dried out by the trees, making it unsuitable for the mosquitoes to breed; A decoction of the leaves is used for repelling insects and vermin; Africans use finely powdered bark as an insect dust; An essential oil is obtained from the leaves; It is used in perfumery and in medicines; The yield is about 0.9% by steam distillation; The essential oil is also in spot removers for cleaning off oil and grease; Yields of 40 to 45 kilos of oil per hectare have been reported; A yellow/brown dye is obtained from the young leaves. It does not require a mordant; Grey and green dyes are obtained from the young shoots; A dark green dye is obtained from the young bark; Wood - heavy; An important timber species, it is used for various purposes such as carpentry, construction, fences, piles, platforms, plywood, poles, sheds, tool handles and veneer; The oil-rich wood is resistant to termites; This is one of the best eucalypts for pulp production for making paper;
Vegetative Spread Rate [2]  None
Flower Color [2]  White
Foliage Color [2]  Gray-Green
Fruit Color [2]  Black
Fall Conspicuous [2]  Yes
Flower Conspicuous [2]  Yes
Fruit Conspicuous [2]  Yes
Height [3]  180 feet (55 m)
Width [3]  49 feet (15 m)
Hardiness Zone Minimum [1]  USDA Zone: 9 Low Temperature: 20 F° (-6.7 C°) → 30 F° (-1.1 C°)
Hardiness Zone Maximum [1]  USDA Zone: 11 Low Temperature: 40 F° (4.4 C°) → 50 F° (10 C°)
Light Preference [2]  Full Sun
Soil Acidity [2]  Moderate Acid
Soil Fertility [2]  Intermediate
Water Use [1]  Moderate to Low
View Plants For A Future Record : Eucalyptus lamprocalyx

Protected Areas

Name IUCN Category Area acres Location Species Website Climate Land Use
Isles of Scilly Complex 66350 England, United Kingdom    
Lavinia Nature Reserve State Reserve II 17390 Tasmania, Australia    
Lower Derwent Valley 2263 England, United Kingdom
Reserva de la Biosfera de Urdaibai Biosphere Reserve V 1777 Spain  

Emblem of

Tasmania

Predators

Consumers

Mutual (symbiont) 
Cortinarius oleosus[15]
Hydnangium carneum[15]
Phaeohelotium succineoguttulatum[8]
Parasitized by 
Golovinomyces orontii[8]
Hemicycliophora brevicauda <Unverified Name>[16]

Distribution

External References

USDA Plant Profile

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1i-Tree Species v. 4.0, developed by the USDA Forest Service's Northern Research Station and SUNY-ESF using the Horticopia, Inc. plant database.
2USDA Plants Database, U. S. Department of Agriculture
3Plants For A Future licensed under a Creative Commons License
4Wood Janka Hardness Scale/Chart J W Morlan's Unique Wood Gifts
5Chave J, Coomes D, Jansen S, Lewis SL, Swenson NG, Zanne AE (2009) Towards a worldwide wood economics spectrum. Ecology Letters 12: 351-366. Zanne AE, Lopez-Gonzalez G, Coomes DA, Ilic J, Jansen S, Lewis SL, Miller RB, Swenson NG, Wiemann MC, Chave J (2009) Data from: Towards a worldwide wood economics spectrum. Dryad Digital Repository.
6New Zealand Institute for Plant & Food Research Plant-SyNZ™ database
7Ben-Dov, Y., Miller, D.R. & Gibson, G.A.P. ScaleNet 4 November 2009
8Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
9Choloepus hoffmanni (Pilosa: Megalonychidae), VIRGINIA HAYSSEN, MAMMALIAN SPECIES 43(873):37–55 (2011)
10Biological Records Centre Database of Insects and their Food Plants
11del Hoyo, J., Elliott, A., Sargatal, J., Christie, D.A. & de Juana, E. (eds.). Handbook of the Birds of the World Alive. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.
12HOSTS - a Database of the World's Lepidopteran Hostplants Gaden S. Robinson, Phillip R. Ackery, Ian J. Kitching, George W. Beccaloni AND Luis M. Hernández
13Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment (Tasmania)
14Sciurus niger, John L. Koprowski, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 479, pp. 1-9 (1994)
15Ecological role of hypogeous ectomycorrhizal fungi in Australian forests and woodlands, Andrew W. Claridge, Plant and Soil 244: 291–305, 2002
16Species Interactions of Australia Database, Atlas of Living Australia, Version ala-csv-2012-11-19
Protected Areas provided by GBIF Global Biodiversity Information Facility
Biological Inventories of the World's Protected Areas in cooperation between the Information Center for the Environment at the University of California, Davis and numerous collaborators.