Animalia > Arthropoda > Insecta > Hymenoptera > Apoidea > Apidae > Apis > Apis mellifera
 

Apis mellifera (honey bee)

Language: French

Wikipedia Abstract

The western honey bee or European honey bee (Apis mellifera) is the most common of the ~40 species of honey bee worldwide. The genus name Apis is Latin for "bee", and mellifera means "honey-bearing", referring to the species' tendency to produce a large quantity of honey for storage over the winter. Western honey bees are an important model organism in scientific studies, particularly in the fields of social evolution, learning and memory; they are also used in studies of pesticide toxicity, to assess non-target impacts of commercial pesticides.
View Wikipedia Record: Apis mellifera

Attributes

Diet [1]  Herbivore
Hibernates [1]  Yes
Maximum Longevity [2]  8 years

Protected Areas

Ecosystems

Emblem of

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

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Predators

Providers

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Distribution

Africa; Australia; Caribbean; Europe & Northern Asia (excluding China); Middle America; North America; Oceania; South America; Southern Asia;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
2de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
3Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
4Study of Northern Virginia Ecology
5Ecology of Commanster
6A Meeting of Opportunists: Birds and Other Visitors to Mabea fistulifera (Euphorbiaceae) Inflorescences, Fábio Olmos and Ricardo L. P. Boulhosa, Ararajuba 8 (2): 93-98 (2000)
7Predator-Prey Database for the family Asilidae (Hexapoda: Diptera) Prepared by Dr. Robert Lavigne, Professor Emeritus, University of Wyoming, USA and Dr. Jason Londt (Natal Museum, Pietermaritzburg)
8del Hoyo, J., Elliott, A., Sargatal, J., Christie, D.A. & de Juana, E. (eds.). Handbook of the Birds of the World Alive. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.
9Diet composition and prey choice by the red-backed shrike Lanius collurio in western Poland, Piotr Tryjanowski, Malgorzata Karolina Karg, Jerzy Karg, Belg. J. Zool., 133 (2) : 157-162 (2003)
10Krebs, J. R., & Avery, M. I. (1985). Central place foraging in the European bee-eater, Merops apiaster. The Journal of Animal Ecology, 459-472.
11Species Interactions of Australia Database, Atlas of Living Australia, Version ala-csv-2012-11-19
12Robertson, C. Flowers and insects lists of visitors of four hundred and fifty three flowers. 1929. The Science Press Printing Company Lancaster, PA.
13Kaiser-Bunbury et al. 2009 Community structure of pollination webs of Mauritian heathland habitats. Perspectives in Plant Ecology, Evolution and Systematics, 11, 241-254.
14Clements, R. E., and F. L. Long. 1923, Experimental pollination. An outline of the ecology of flowers and insects. Washington, D.C., USA, Carnegie Institute of Washington.
15Dupont YL, Hansen DM and Olesen JM (2003) Structure of a plant-flower-visitor network in the high-altitude sub-alpine desert of Tenerife, Canary Islands. Ecography 26:301-310
16Ollerton, J., S. D. Johnson, L. Cranmer, and S. Kellie. 2003. The pollination ecology of an assemblage of grassland asclepiads in South Africa. Annals of Botany 92:807-834
17Pollination networks of oil-flowers: a tiny world within the smallest of all worlds, Bezerra, Elisângela L.S.; Machado, Isabel C.; Mello, Marco A. R., Journal of Animal Ecology, Volume 78, Number 5, September 2009 , pp. 1096-1101(6)
18Kato, M., T. Makutani, T. Inoue, and T. Itino. 1990. Insect-flower relationship in the primary beech forest of Ashu, Kyoto: an overview of the flowering phenology and seasonal pattern of insect visits. Contr. Biol. Lab. Kyoto Univ. 27:309-375.
19Motten, A. F. 1986. Pollination ecology of the spring wildflower community of a temperate deciduous forest. Ecological Monographs 56:21-42.
20Insect-flower associations in the high Arctic with special reference to nectar., Hocking, B. 1968. Oikos 19:359-388
21Small, E. 1976. Insect pollinators of the Mer Bleue peat bog of Ottawa. Canadian Field Naturalist 90:22-28.
22Ramirez, N., and Y. Brito. 1992. Pollination Biology in a Palm Swamp Community in the Venezuelan Central Plains. Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society 110:277-302.
23Co-pollinators and specialization in the pollinating seed-consumer mutualism between senita cacti and senita moths, J. Nathaniel Holland, Theodore H. Fleming, Oecologia (2002) 133:534–540
24Arnold SEJ, Faruq S, Savolainen V, McOwan PW, Chittka L, 2010 FReD: The Floral Reflectance Database — A Web Portal for Analyses of Flower Colour. PLoS ONE 5(12): e14287.
Protected Areas provided by Ramsar Sites Information Service
GBIF Global Biodiversity Information Facility
Carlsbad Caverns National Park
Edwin S. George Reserve, University of Michigan, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License