Animalia > Chordata > Amphibia > Anura > Hylidae > Hyla > Hyla squirella
 

Hyla squirella (Squirrel Treefrog)

Wikipedia Abstract

The squirrel tree frog (Hyla squirella) is a small species of tree frog found in the southeastern United States, from Texas to Virginia. Squirrel tree frogs are small frogs, about 1.5 inches in length as adults. There are several color variations, but most commonly they are green and look very much like the American green tree frog (Hyla cinerea). They can also be varying shades of yellow or brown, sometimes with white or brown blotching. This is an introduced species in the Bahamas.
View Wikipedia Record: Hyla squirella

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
3
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
21
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 7.14
EDGE Score: 2.1

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  2.88 grams
Diet [1]  Carnivore (Invertebrates)
Gestation [2]  1 days
Litter Size [2]  1,000
Litters / Year [2]  1
Maximum Longevity [2]  9 years
Nocturnal [1]  Yes
Snout to Vent Length [1]  1.772 inches (4.5 cm)

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Prey / Diet

Ascia monuste (Great southern white)[3]
Chrysops atlanticus[3]
Culex tarsalis[3]

Predators

Lanius ludovicianus (Loggerhead Shrike)[3]
Procyon lotor (Raccoon)[3]
Thamnophis sauritus (Eastern Ribbonsnake)[4]

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Cylindrotaenia americana <Unverified Name>[5]

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

North America;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Oliveira, Brunno Freire; São-Pedro, Vinícius Avelar; Santos-Barrera, Georgina; Penone, Caterina; C. Costa, Gabriel. (2017) AmphiBIO, a global database for amphibian ecological traits. Sci. Data.
2de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
3Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
4ECOLOGY OF THE EASTERN RIBBONSNAKE (THAMNOPHIS SAURITUS) IN SOUTHERN ALABAMA WITH EVIDENCE OF SEASONAL MULTIPLE BROODS, GABRIEL J. LANGFORD, JOEL A. BORDEN, AND DAVID H. NELSON, Herpetological Conservation and Biology 6(3):400–409 (2011)
5Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License