Animalia > Chordata > Amphibia > Anura > Hylidae > Hyla > Hyla cinerea
 

Hyla cinerea (Green Treefrog; Green Tree Frog)

Synonyms: Calamita cinereus; Hyla cinerea cinerea; Hyla cinerea evittata; Hyla evittata

Wikipedia Abstract

The American green tree frog (Hyla cinerea) is a common species of New World tree frog belonging to the genus Hyla. A common backyard species, it is popular as a pet, and is the state amphibian of Georgia and Louisiana.
View Wikipedia Record: Hyla cinerea

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
3
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
21
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 7.14
EDGE Score: 2.1

Attributes

Litter Size [3]  1,222
Litters / Year [2]  2
Snout to Vent Length [2]  2.598 inches (6.6 cm)
Water Biome [1]  Lakes and Ponds, Rivers and Streams
Adult Weight [2]  10.82 grams
Diet [1]  Carnivore
Female Maturity [3]  2 years
Male Maturity [3]  2 years

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Emblem of

Georgia (US)
Louisiana

Predators

Agkistrodon piscivorus (conanti)[4]
Lanius ludovicianus (Loggerhead Shrike)[5]
Thamnophis sauritus (Eastern Ribbonsnake)[6]

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Alaria marcianae <Unverified Name>[7]
Clinostomum attenuatum <Unverified Name>[7]
Cosmocercella haberi <Unverified Name>[7]

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

Caribbean; Middle America; North America;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
2Oliveira, Brunno Freire; São-Pedro, Vinícius Avelar; Santos-Barrera, Georgina; Penone, Caterina; C. Costa, Gabriel. (2017) AmphiBIO, a global database for amphibian ecological traits. Sci. Data.
3de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
4Sexual dimorphism in head shape and diet in the cottonmouth snake (Agkistrodon piscivorus), Shawn E. Vincent, Anthony Herrel and Duncan J. Irschick, J. Zool., Lond. (2004) 264, 53–59
5Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
6ECOLOGY OF THE EASTERN RIBBONSNAKE (THAMNOPHIS SAURITUS) IN SOUTHERN ALABAMA WITH EVIDENCE OF SEASONAL MULTIPLE BROODS, GABRIEL J. LANGFORD, JOEL A. BORDEN, AND DAVID H. NELSON, Herpetological Conservation and Biology 6(3):400–409 (2011)
7Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License