Animalia > Chordata > Aves > Procellariiformes > Procellariidae > Puffinus > Puffinus tenuirostris
 

Puffinus tenuirostris (Short-tailed Shearwater)

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Wikipedia Abstract

The short-tailed shearwater or slender-billed shearwater (Ardenna tenuirostris; formerly Puffinus tenuirostris), also called yolla or moonbird, and commonly known as the muttonbird in Australia, is the most abundant seabird species in Australian waters, and is one of the few Australian native birds in which the chicks are commercially harvested. It is a migratory species that breeds mainly on small islands in Bass Strait and Tasmania and migrates to the Northern Hemisphere for the boreal summer.
View Wikipedia Record: Puffinus tenuirostris

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
10
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
28
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 8.29458
EDGE Score: 2.22943

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  1.10 lbs (499 g)
Birth Weight [2]  82 grams
Diet [3]  Carnivore (Invertebrates), Piscivore
Diet - Fish [3]  70 %
Diet - Invertibrates [3]  30 %
Forages - Water Surface [3]  20 %
Forages - Underwater [3]  80 %
Clutch Size [1]  1
Incubation [1]  53 days
Maximum Longevity [1]  30 years
Migration [4]  Interoceanic
Wing Span [5]  37 inches (.95 m)

Ecoregions

Name Countries Ecozone Biome Species Report Climate Land
Use
Antipodes Subantarctic Islands tundra Australia, New Zealand Australasia Tundra    

Protected Areas

Important Bird Areas

Name Location  IBA Criteria   Website   Climate   Land Use 
Babushkina bay Russia (Asian) A1, A4i, A4iii

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Haliaeetus leucocephalus (Bald Eagle)[6]

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Anisakis appendiculata <Unverified Name>[10]
Parapsyllus australiacus[11]
Parapsyllus taylori[11]
Seuratia puffini <Unverified Name>[10]
Tetrabothrius macrocephalus[10]

Range Map

Distribution

North America; Oceania;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
2Terje Lislevand, Jordi Figuerola, and Tamás Székely. 2007. Avian body sizes in relation to fecundity, mating system, display behavior, and resource sharing. Ecology 88:1605
3Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
4Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
5del Hoyo, J., Elliott, A., Sargatal, J., Christie, D.A. & de Juana, E. (eds.). Handbook of the Birds of the World Alive. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.
6Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
7Szoboszlai AI, Thayer JA, Wood SA, Sydeman WJ, Koehn LE (2015) Forage species in predator diets: synthesis of data from the California Current. Ecological Informatics 29(1): 45-56. Szoboszlai AI, Thayer JA, Wood SA, Sydeman WJ, Koehn LE (2015) Data from: Forage species in predator diets: synthesis of data from the California Current. Dryad Digital Repository.
8CephBase - Cephalopod (Octopus, Squid, Cuttlefish and Nautilus) Database
9Seabird distribution, abundance and diets in the eastern and central Aleutian Islands, J. JAHNCKE, K. O. COYLE AND GEORGE L. HUNT, JR, Fish. Oceanogr. 14 (Suppl. 1), 160–177, 2005
10Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
11International Flea Database
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License