Animalia > Chordata > Aves > Suliformes > Sulidae > Sula > Sula sula
 

Sula sula (Red-footed Booby)

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Wikipedia Abstract

The red-footed booby (Sula sula) is a large seabird of the booby family, Sulidae. As suggested by the name, adults always have red feet, but the colour of the plumage varies. They are powerful and agile fliers, but they are clumsy in takeoffs and landings. They are found widely in the tropics, and breed colonially in coastal regions, especially islands.
View Wikipedia Record: Sula sula

Infraspecies

Sula sula rubripes (Hawaiian red-footed booby) (Attributes)
Sula sula sula (Red-footed booby)
Sula sula websteri

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
20
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
39
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 15.983
EDGE Score: 2.83221

Attributes

Clutch Size [2]  1
Clutches / Year [2]  1
Global Population (2017 est.) [3]  1,400,000
Incubation [2]  44 days
Maximum Longevity [2]  23 years
Nocturnal [1]  Yes
Water Biome [1]  Pelagic, Coastal
Wing Span [5]  38 inches (.96 m)
Adult Weight [2]  2.242 lbs (1.017 kg)
Birth Weight [2]  40 grams
Breeding Habitat [3]  Oceanic islands, Pelagic
Wintering Geography [3]  Tropical Oceans
Wintering Habitat [3]  Coastal marine, Pelagic
Diet [4]  Carnivore (Invertebrates), Piscivore
Diet - Fish [4]  50 %
Diet - Invertibrates [4]  50 %
Forages - Underwater [4]  100 %
Female Maturity [2]  2 years
Male Maturity [2]  2 years

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Important Bird Areas

Biodiversity Hotspots

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Pectinopygus sulae[8]

Range Map

Distribution

Aldabra Special Reserve; North America;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
2de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
3Partners in Flight Avian Conservation Assessment Database, version 2017. Accessed on January 2018.
4Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
5Riede, Klaus (2004) Global Register of Migratory Species - from Global to Regional Scales. Final Report of the R&D-Projekt 808 05 081. 330 pages + CD-ROM
6Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
7FEEDING ECOLOGY OF TWO SUBTROPICAL SEABIRD SPECIES AT FRENCH FRIGATE SHOALS. HAWAII, Michael P. Seki and Craig S. Harrison, BULLETIN OF MARINE SCIENCE. 45(1): 52-67, 1989
8Species Interactions of Australia Database, Atlas of Living Australia, Version ala-csv-2012-11-19
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License