Animalia > Chordata > Aves > Anseriformes > Anatidae > Anser > Anser indicus
 

Anser indicus (Bar-headed Goose)

Wikipedia Abstract

The bar-headed goose (Anser indicus) is a goose that breeds in Central Asia in colonies of thousands near mountain lakes and winters in South Asia, as far south as peninsular India. It lays three to eight eggs at a time in a ground nest. Vogel suggests that Bar-headed goose is likely to be Hamsa of Indian mythology. Dave suggests that Bar-headed goose is likely to be Kadamb in ancient and medieval Sanskrit literature, whereas Hamsa generally refers to swan.
View Wikipedia Record: Anser indicus

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
0
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
8
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 2.61662
EDGE Score: 1.28554

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  5.243 lbs (2.378 kg)
Birth Weight [2]  141 grams
Diet [3]  Herbivore
Diet - Plants [3]  100 %
Forages - Ground [3]  80 %
Forages - Water Surface [3]  20 %
Clutch Size [5]  5
Incubation [4]  28 days
Migration [6]  Intracontinental
Wing Span [4]  4.92 feet (1.5 m)

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Important Bird Areas

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
Himalaya Bhutan, China, India, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan No
Indo-Burma Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, India, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand, Viet Nam No
Mountains of Central Asia Afghanistan, China, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan No
Mountains of Southwest China China, Myanmar No
Western Ghats and Sri Lanka India, Sri Lanka No

Prey / Diet

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Echinostoma novum <Unverified Name>[8]
Epomidiostomum orispinum <Unverified Name>[8]

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1A comparative study of egg mass and clutch size in the Anseriformes, Jordi Figuerola and Andy J. Green, J Ornithol (2006) 147: 57–68
2Terje Lislevand, Jordi Figuerola, and Tamás Székely. 2007. Avian body sizes in relation to fecundity, mating system, display behavior, and resource sharing. Ecology 88:1605
3Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
4del Hoyo, J., Elliott, A., Sargatal, J., Christie, D.A. & de Juana, E. (eds.). Handbook of the Birds of the World Alive. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.
5Jetz W, Sekercioglu CH, Böhning-Gaese K (2008) The Worldwide Variation in Avian Clutch Size across Species and Space PLoS Biol 6(12): e303. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.0060303
6Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
7Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
8Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Protected Areas provided by Biological Inventories of the World's Protected Areas in cooperation between the Information Center for the Environment at the University of California, Davis and numerous collaborators.
GBIF Global Biodiversity Information Facility
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License