Animalia > Chordata > Aves > Anseriformes > Anatidae > Anas > Anas versicolor
 

Anas versicolor (Silver Teal)

Wikipedia Abstract

The silver teal or versicolor teal (Anas versicolor) is a species of dabbling duck in the genus Anas. It breeds in South America. Between April and June they prefer reed beds and will lay 6 to 10 creamy-pink eggs. As with swans and geese, both parents will rear the ducklings. A pair may bond long term. It lives on fresh water in small groups, and feeds primarily on vegetable matter such as seeds and aquatic plants. Silver teals are on the whole placid ducks but may be protective of eggs, young and females.
View Wikipedia Record: Anas versicolor

Infraspecies

Anas versicolor fretensis (Southern silver teal)
Anas versicolor versicolor (Northern silver teal)

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
2
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
12
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 2.53516
EDGE Score: 1.26276

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  410 grams
Birth Weight [2]  34 grams
Female Weight [1]  380 grams
Male Weight [1]  440 grams
Weight Dimorphism [1]  15.8 %
Diet [3]  Carnivore (Invertebrates), Granivore, Herbivore
Diet - Invertibrates [3]  10 %
Diet - Plants [3]  60 %
Diet - Seeds [3]  30 %
Forages - Water Surface [3]  80 %
Forages - Underwater [3]  20 %
Clutch Size [4]  8
Incubation [1]  25 days

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
Atlantic Forest Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay No
Chilean Winter Rainfall-Valdivian Forests Chile No
Tropical Andes Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Venezuela No

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Cloacotaenia megalops[5]
Fimbriaria fasciolaris[5]

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1del Hoyo, J., Elliott, A., Sargatal, J., Christie, D.A. & de Juana, E. (eds.). Handbook of the Birds of the World Alive. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.
2Terje Lislevand, Jordi Figuerola, and Tamás Székely. 2007. Avian body sizes in relation to fecundity, mating system, display behavior, and resource sharing. Ecology 88:1605
3Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
4Jetz W, Sekercioglu CH, Böhning-Gaese K (2008) The Worldwide Variation in Avian Clutch Size across Species and Space PLoS Biol 6(12): e303. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.0060303
5Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License