Animalia > Chordata > Aves > Anseriformes > Anatidae > Amazonetta > Amazonetta brasiliensis
 

Amazonetta brasiliensis (Brazilian Teal)

Wikipedia Abstract

The Brazilian teal or Brazilian duck (Amazonetta brasiliensis) is the only duck in the genus Amazonetta. It was formerly considered a "perching duck", but more recent analyses indicate that it belongs to a clade of South American dabbling ducks which also includes the crested duck, the bronze-winged duck, and possibly the steamer ducks. The ducks are light brown in colour. Drakes distinguish themselves from females in having red beaks and legs, and in having a distinctive pale grey area on the side of its head and neck. The colour of these limbs is much duller in females.
View Wikipedia Record: Amazonetta brasiliensis

Infraspecies

Amazonetta brasiliensis brasiliensis (Lesser Brazilian teal)
Amazonetta brasiliensis ipecutiri (Greater Brazilian teal)

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
1
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
13
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 4.02505
EDGE Score: 1.61443

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  400 grams
Birth Weight [2]  38 grams
Diet [3]  Carnivore (Invertebrates), Frugivore, Herbivore
Diet - Fruit [3]  40 %
Diet - Invertibrates [3]  20 %
Diet - Plants [3]  40 %
Forages - Ground [3]  80 %
Forages - Water Surface [3]  20 %
Clutch Size [5]  7
Incubation [4]  27 days
Migration [6]  Migratory

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
Atlantic Forest Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay No
Cerrado Brazil No
Tropical Andes Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Venezuela No

Prey / Diet

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Cloacotaenia megalops[8]
Fimbriaria fasciolaris[8]
Notocotylus breviserialis <Unverified Name>[8]

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

External References

Audio

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Provided by Xeno-canto under a Creative Commons BY-NC-ND 2.5 License Author: Bernabe Lopez-Lanus

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1A comparative study of egg mass and clutch size in the Anseriformes, Jordi Figuerola and Andy J. Green, J Ornithol (2006) 147: 57–68
2PRACTICAL METHODS OF ESTIMATING VOLUME AND FRESH WEIGHT OF BIRD EGGS, DONALD F. HOYT, The Auk 96:73-77. January 1979
3Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
4del Hoyo, J., Elliott, A., Sargatal, J., Christie, D.A. & de Juana, E. (eds.). Handbook of the Birds of the World Alive. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.
5Jetz W, Sekercioglu CH, Böhning-Gaese K (2008) The Worldwide Variation in Avian Clutch Size across Species and Space PLoS Biol 6(12): e303. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.0060303
6Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
7Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
8Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
Audio software provided by SoundManager 2