Animalia > Chordata > Aves > Accipitriformes > Accipitridae > Accipiter > Accipiter cooperii
 

Accipiter cooperii (Cooper's Hawk)

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Wikipedia Abstract

Cooper's hawk (Accipiter cooperii) is a medium-sized hawk native to the North American continent and found from Southern Canada to Northern Mexico. As in many birds of prey, the male is smaller than the female. The birds found east of the Mississippi River tend to be larger on average than the birds found to the west. Other common names for the Cooper's hawk include: big blue darter, chicken hawk, flying cross, hen hawk, quail hawk, striker, and swift hawk.
View Wikipedia Record: Accipiter cooperii

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
9
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
27
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 7.42195
EDGE Score: 2.13084

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  439 grams
Birth Weight [3]  28 grams
Female Weight [1]  1.166 lbs (529 g)
Male Weight [1]  349 grams
Weight Dimorphism [1]  51.6 %
Breeding Habitat [2]  Forests
Wintering Geography [2]  Widespread
Wintering Habitat [2]  Generalist
Diet [4]  Carnivore (Vertebrates)
Diet - Ectothermic [4]  10 %
Diet - Endothermic [4]  90 %
Forages - Aerial [4]  10 %
Forages - Canopy [4]  10 %
Forages - Mid-High [4]  20 %
Forages - Understory [4]  20 %
Forages - Ground [4]  40 %
Female Maturity [3]  2 years
Male Maturity [3]  2 years
Clutch Size [5]  4
Clutches / Year [3]  1
Global Population (2017 est.) [2]  820,000
Incubation [3]  24 days
Maximum Longevity [3]  12 years
Wing Span [6]  30 inches (.75 m)

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

+ Click for partial list (100)Full list (254)

Ecosystems

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
California Floristic Province Mexico, United States No
Madrean Pine-Oak Woodlands Mexico, United States No
Mesoamerica Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama No

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Accipiter gentilis (Northern Goshawk)[7]
Aquila chrysaetos (Golden Eagle)[7]
Buteogallus anthracinus (Common Black-Hawk)[7]

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

North America; Western Michigan University’s Asylum Lake;

External References

Audio

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Provided by Xeno-canto under a Creative Commons BY-NC-ND 2.5 License Author: Jonathon Jongsma

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Mueller, HC, DD Berger, and G. Allez. 1981. Age, sex, and seasonal differences in size of Cooper's Hawks. J. Field Ornithol 52:112–126
2Partners in Flight Avian Conservation Assessment Database, version 2017. Accessed on January 2018.
3de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
4Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
5Jetz W, Sekercioglu CH, Böhning-Gaese K (2008) The Worldwide Variation in Avian Clutch Size across Species and Space PLoS Biol 6(12): e303. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.0060303
6del Hoyo, J., Elliott, A., Sargatal, J., Christie, D.A. & de Juana, E. (eds.). Handbook of the Birds of the World Alive. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.
7Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
8Blarina carolinensis, Timothy S. McCay, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 673, pp. 1–7 (2001)
9Lafferty, K. D., R. F. Hechinger, J. C. Shaw, K. L. Whitney and A. M. Kuris (in press) Food webs and parasites in a salt marsh ecosystem. In Disease ecology: community structure and pathogen dynamics (eds S. Collinge and C. Ray). Oxford University Press, Oxford.
10The Cactus Ferruginous Pygmy-Owl: Taxonomy, Distribution, and Natural History, Jean-Luc E. Cartron, W. Scott Richardson, Glenn A. Proudfoot, USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-43. 2000
11Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
12Sylvilagus audubonii, Joseph A. Chapman and Gale R. Willner, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 106, pp. 1-4 (1978)
13Sylvilagus bachmani, Joseph A. Chapman, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 34, pp. 1-4 (1974)
14Tamias dorsalis, E. Blake Hart, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 399, pp. 1-6 (1992)
15Tamias merriami, Troy L. Best and Nancy J. Granai, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 476, pp. 1-9 (1994)
16FEEDING BEHAVIOR AND DIET OF THE LONG-BILLED CURLEW AND WILLET, LYNNE E. STENZEL, HARRIET R. HUBER, AND GARY W. PAGE, THE WILSON BULLETIN - Vol. 88, No. 2, June 1976
17Spermophilus brunneus, Eric Yensen and Paul W. Sherman, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 560, pp. 1-5 (1997)
18Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
Audio software provided by SoundManager 2