Animalia > Chordata > Aves > Accipitriformes > Accipitridae > Buteo > Buteo jamaicensis
 

Buteo jamaicensis (Red-tailed Hawk)

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Wikipedia Abstract

The red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) is a bird of prey, one of three species colloquially known in the United States as the "chickenhawk," though it rarely preys on standard sized chickens. It breeds throughout most of North America, from western Alaska and northern Canada to as far south as Panama and the West Indies, and is one of the most common buteos in North America. Red-tailed hawks can acclimate to all the biomes within their range. There are fourteen recognized subspecies, which vary in appearance and range. It is one of the largest members of the genus Buteo in North America, typically weighing from 690 to 1,600 g (1.5 to 3.5 lb) and measuring 45–65 cm (18–26 in) in length, with a wingspan from 110–145 cm (43–57 in). The red-tailed hawk displays sexual dimorphism in size, with
View Wikipedia Record: Buteo jamaicensis

Infraspecies

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
5
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
20
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 4.5573
EDGE Score: 1.71511

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  2.482 lbs (1.126 kg)
Birth Weight [3]  58 grams
Female Weight [1]  2.698 lbs (1.224 kg)
Male Weight [1]  2.266 lbs (1.028 kg)
Weight Dimorphism [1]  19.1 %
Breeding Habitat [2]  Generalist
Wintering Geography [2]  Widespread
Wintering Habitat [2]  Generalist, Agricultural
Diet [4]  Carnivore (Invertebrates), Carnivore (Vertebrates)
Diet - Ectothermic [4]  30 %
Diet - Endothermic [4]  60 %
Diet - Invertibrates [4]  10 %
Forages - Aerial [4]  33 %
Forages - Canopy [4]  33 %
Forages - Mid-High [4]  33 %
Female Maturity [3]  2 years
Male Maturity [3]  2 years
Clutch Size [5]  2
Clutches / Year [3]  1
Global Population (2017 est.) [2]  2,900,000
Incubation [3]  31 days
Maximum Longevity [3]  30 years
Speed [6]  121.152 MPH (54.16 m/s)
Wing Span [7]  4.002 feet (1.22 m)

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

+ Click for partial list (100)Full list (322)

Ecosystems

Important Bird Areas

Name Location  IBA Criteria   Website   Climate   Land Use 
Tadoussac Canada A4i, A4iii

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
California Floristic Province Mexico, United States No
Caribbean Islands Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, Aruba, Bahamas, Barbados, Cayman Islands, Cuba, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Haiti, Grenada, Guadeloupe, Jamaica, Martinique, Montserrat, Netherlands Antilles, Puerto Rico, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent And The Grenadines, Trinidad and Tobago, Turks And Caicos Islands, Virgin Islands - British, Virgin Islands - U.S. No
Madrean Pine-Oak Woodlands Mexico, United States No
Mesoamerica Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama No

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

+ Click for partial list (89)Full list (141)

Predators

Aquila chrysaetos (Golden Eagle)[8]
Haliaeetus leucocephalus (Bald Eagle)[8]

Providers

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

Caribbean; North America; Western Michigan University’s Asylum Lake;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Snyder, NFR, and JW Wiley. 1976. Sexual size dimorphism in hawks and owls of North America. Ornithol. Monogr. 20:1-96
2Partners in Flight Avian Conservation Assessment Database, version 2017. Accessed on January 2018.
3de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
4Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
5Jetz W, Sekercioglu CH, Böhning-Gaese K (2008) The Worldwide Variation in Avian Clutch Size across Species and Space PLoS Biol 6(12): e303. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.0060303
6Alerstam T, Rosén M, Bäckman J, Ericson PGP, Hellgren O (2007) Flight Speeds among Bird Species: Allometric and Phylogenetic Effects. PLoS Biol 5(8): e197. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.0050197
7Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
8Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
9Study of Northern Virginia Ecology
10Anurans as prey: an exploratory analysis and size relationships between predators and their prey, L. F. Toledo, R. S. Ribeiro & C. F. B. Haddad, Journal of Zoology 271 (2007) 170–177
11Neotoma cinerea, Felisa A. Smith, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 564, pp. 1-8 (1997)
12Blarina carolinensis, Timothy S. McCay, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 673, pp. 1–7 (2001)
13Spermophilus saturatus, Stephan C. Trombulak, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 322, pp. 1-4 (1988)
14FOOD HABITS AND NEST CHARACTERISTICS OF BREEDING RAPTORS IN SOUTHWESTERN WYOMING, Patricia A. MacLaren, Stanley H. Anderson, and Douglas E. Runde, Great Basin Naturalist Vol. 48, No. 4 pp. 548-553 (1988)
15Geomys breviceps, James M. Sulentich, Lawrence R. Williams, and Guy N. Cameron, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 383, pp. 1-4 (1991)
16Geomys bursarius (Rodentia: Geomyidae), MATTHEW B. CONNIOR, MAMMALIAN SPECIES 43(879):104–117 (2011)
17Glaucomys sabrinus, Nancy Wells-Gosling and Lawrence R. Heaney, Mammalian Species No. 229, pp. 1-8 (1984)
18The Breeding Ecology of Least Bitterns (Ixobrychus exilis) at Agassiz and Mingo National Wildlife Refuges, Karen Elizabeth Arnold, Thesis for Master of Science Major in Wildlife and Fisheries South Dakota State University 2005
19Microtus californicus (Rodentia: Cricetidae), NICHOLE L. CUDWORTH AND JOHN L. KOPROWSKI, MAMMALIAN SPECIES 42(868):230–243 (2010)
20Neotoma fuscipes, L. N. Carraway and B. J. Verts, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 386, pp. 1-10 (1991)
21Neotoma lepida, B. J. Verts and Leslie N. Carraway, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 699, pp. 1–12 (2002)
22Scapanus latimanus, B. J. Verts and Leslie N. Carraway, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 666, pp. 1–7 (2001)
23Sciurus arizonensis, Troy L. Best and Suzanne Riedel, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 496, pp. 1-5 (1995)
24Sciurus griseus, Leslie N. Carraway and B. J. Verts, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 474, pp. 1-7 (1994)
25Sciurus niger, John L. Koprowski, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 479, pp. 1-9 (1994)
26Sylvilagus audubonii, Joseph A. Chapman and Gale R. Willner, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 106, pp. 1-4 (1978)
27Sylvilagus bachmani, Joseph A. Chapman, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 34, pp. 1-4 (1974)
28Sylvilagus nuttallii, Joseph A. Chapman, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 56, pp. 1-3 (1975)
29Tadarida brasiliensis, Kenneth T. Wilkins, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 331, pp. 1-10 (1989)
30Thomomys bottae, Cheri A. Jones and Colleen N. Baxter, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 742, pp. 1–14 (2004)
31Spermophilus brunneus, Eric Yensen and Paul W. Sherman, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 560, pp. 1-5 (1997)
32Spermophilus columbianus, Charles L. Elliott and Jerran T. Flinders, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 372, pp. 1-9 (1991)
33Spermophilus elegans, David A. Zegers, Mammalian Species No. 214, pp. 1-7 (1984)
34Spermophilus townsendii, Eric A. Rickart, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 268, pp. 1-6 (1987)
35Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License