Animalia > Chordata > Aves > Accipitriformes > Accipitridae > Gypaetus > Gypaetus barbatus
 

Gypaetus barbatus (Bearded Vulture)

Wikipedia Abstract

The bearded vulture (Gypaetus barbatus), also known as the lammergeier or ossifrage, is a bird of prey and the only member of the genus Gypaetus. Traditionally considered an Old World vulture, it actually forms a minor lineage of Accipitridae together with the Egyptian vulture (Neophron percnopterus), its closest living relative. It is not much more closely related to the Old World vultures proper than to, for example, hawks, and differs from the former by its feathered neck. Although dissimilar, the Egyptian and bearded vulture each have a lozenge-shaped tail — unusual among birds of prey. In July 2014, the IUCN Red List has reassesed this species to be near threatened. Before July 2014, it was actually classed as Least Concern. Their population trend is decreasing.
View Wikipedia Record: Gypaetus barbatus

Infraspecies

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
37
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
47
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 27.7121
EDGE Score: 3.35732

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  11.177 lbs (5.07 kg)
Birth Weight [2]  224 grams
Diet [3]  Carnivore (Vertebrates)
Diet - Scavenger [3]  100 %
Forages - Ground [3]  100 %
Clutch Size [5]  1
Incubation [4]  54 days
Maximum Longevity [1]  40 years
Wing Span [6]  8.594 feet (2.62 m)

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

+ Click for partial list (100)Full list (176)

Important Bird Areas

Biodiversity Hotspots

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Callopsylla gypaetina[9]
Pulex irritans (human flea)[9]

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
2Terje Lislevand, Jordi Figuerola, and Tamás Székely. 2007. Avian body sizes in relation to fecundity, mating system, display behavior, and resource sharing. Ecology 88:1605
3Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
4del Hoyo, J., Elliott, A., Sargatal, J., Christie, D.A. & de Juana, E. (eds.). Handbook of the Birds of the World Alive. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.
5Jetz W, Sekercioglu CH, Böhning-Gaese K (2008) The Worldwide Variation in Avian Clutch Size across Species and Space PLoS Biol 6(12): e303. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.0060303
6National Geographic Magazine - January 2016 - Vultures - Elizabeth Royte
7Assessing the diet of nestling Bearded Vultures: a comparison between direct observation methods, Antoni Margalida, Joan Bertran, and Jennifer Boudet, J. Field Ornithol. 76(1):40–45, 2005
8Capra cylindricornis, Paul J. Weinberg, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 695, pp. 1–9 (2002)
9International Flea Database
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Protected Areas provided by Natura 2000, UK data: © Crown copyright and database right [2010] All rights reserved. Ordnance Survey Licence number 100017955
Specially protected natural territories of the Russian Federation, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment of the Russian Federation
Biological Inventories of the World's Protected Areas in cooperation between the Information Center for the Environment at the University of California, Davis and numerous collaborators.
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License