Animalia > Chordata > Aves > Galliformes > Phasianidae > Pavo > Pavo muticus
 

Pavo muticus (Green Peafowl)

Wikipedia Abstract

The green peafowl (Pavo muticus) (from Latin Pavo, peafowl; muticus, Mute, docked or curtailed) is a species of peafowl that is found in the tropical forests of Southeast Asia. It is also known as the Java peafowl, but this term is properly used to describe the nominate subspecies endemic to the island of Java in Indonesia. It is the closest relative of the Indian peafowl or blue peafowl (Pavo cristatus), which is mostly found on the Indian subcontinent.
View Wikipedia Record: Pavo muticus

Infraspecies

Pavo muticus imperator (Indochinese green peafowl)
Pavo muticus muticus (Javan green peafowl)
Pavo muticus spicifer (Burmese green peafowl)

Endangered Species

Status: Endangered
View IUCN Record: Pavo muticus

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
3
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
54
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 8.01383
EDGE Score: 4.2782

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  7.555 lbs (3.427 kg)
Birth Weight [2]  101 grams
Female Weight [4]  2.425 lbs (1.10 kg)
Male Weight [4]  9.756 lbs (4.425 kg)
Weight Dimorphism [4]  302.3 %
Diet [3]  Carnivore (Invertebrates), Frugivore, Granivore, Herbivore
Diet - Fruit [3]  10 %
Diet - Invertibrates [3]  70 %
Diet - Plants [3]  10 %
Diet - Seeds [3]  10 %
Forages - Ground [3]  100 %
Clutch Size [5]  4
Fledging [1]  14 days
Incubation [5]  27 days
Maximum Longevity [1]  8 years
Snout to Vent Length [1]  3.444 feet (105 cm)
Wing Span [4]  3.936 feet (1.2 m)
Female Maturity [1]  3 years 11 months

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Important Bird Areas

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
Indo-Burma Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, India, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand, Viet Nam No
Mountains of Southwest China China, Myanmar No
Sundaland Brunei Darussalam, Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand No

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Competing SpeciesCommon Prey Count
Bubalus mindorensis (tamaraw)1
Cynopterus sphinx (greater short-nosed fruit bat)1
Ploceus hypoxanthus (Asian Golden Weaver)1
Rhinoceros unicornis (Indian rhinoceros)1

Predators

Herpestes javanicus (Small Asian Mongoose)[5]
Prionailurus bengalensis (Leopard Cat)[5]

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Cyrnea lyruri <Unverified Name>[6]
Paronchocerca rousseloti <Unverified Name>[6]
Pseudaspidodera pavonis <Unverified Name>[6]
Strongyloides pavonis <Unverified Name>[6]

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Distribution

Southern Asia;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Nathan P. Myhrvold, Elita Baldridge, Benjamin Chan, Dhileep Sivam, Daniel L. Freeman, and S. K. Morgan Ernest. 2015. An amniote life-history database to perform comparative analyses with birds, mammals, and reptiles. Ecology 96:3109
2PRACTICAL METHODS OF ESTIMATING VOLUME AND FRESH WEIGHT OF BIRD EGGS, DONALD F. HOYT, The Auk 96:73-77. January 1979
3Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
4Biddle, Tami Davis, Pheasants, Partridges, and Grouse : A Guide to the Pheasants, Partridges, Quails, Grouse, Guineafowl, Buttonquails, and Sandgrouse of the World, (Princeton Field Guides). Princeton University Press (2002)
5Green Peafowl, BirdLife International (2001) Threatened birds of Asia: the BirdLife International Red Data Book. Cambridge, UK: BirdLife International.
6Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License