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Grus canadensis (Sandhill Crane)

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Wikipedia Abstract

The sandhill crane (Grus canadensis) is a species of large crane of North America and extreme northeastern Siberia. The common name of this bird refers to habitat like that at the Platte River, on the edge of Nebraska's Sandhills on the American Plains. This is the most important stopover area for the nominotypical subspecies, the lesser sandhill crane (Grus canadensis canadensis), with up to 450,000 of these birds migrating through annually. The scientific name is from Latin; grus is "crane", and canadensis is "Canadian".
View Wikipedia Record: Grus canadensis

Infraspecies

Grus canadensis canadensis (Lesser Sandhill Crane) (Attributes)
Grus canadensis nesiotes (Cuba Sandhill Crane)
Grus canadensis pratensis (Florida sandhill crane) (Attributes)
Grus canadensis pulla (Mississippi Sandhill Crane)
Grus canadensis rowani (Sandhill Crane) (Attributes)
Grus canadensis tabida (Greater sandhill crane)

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
4
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
24
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 9.03817
EDGE Score: 2.30639

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  9.537 lbs (4.326 kg)
Birth Weight [2]  114 grams
Female Weight [1]  9.079 lbs (4.118 kg)
Male Weight [1]  9.998 lbs (4.535 kg)
Weight Dimorphism [1]  10.1 %
Diet [3]  Carnivore (Invertebrates), Carnivore (Vertebrates), Frugivore, Granivore, Herbivore
Diet - Endothermic [3]  20 %
Diet - Fruit [3]  20 %
Diet - Invertibrates [3]  20 %
Diet - Plants [3]  30 %
Diet - Seeds [3]  10 %
Forages - Ground [3]  50 %
Forages - Water Surface [3]  50 %
Clutch Size [4]  2
Clutches / Year [2]  1
Fledging [1]  71 days
Incubation [2]  29 days
Maximum Longevity [2]  31 years
Wing Span [5]  6.888 feet (2.1 m)
Female Maturity [2]  3 years
Male Maturity [2]  3 years

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

+ Click for partial list (100)Full list (144)

Important Bird Areas

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
California Floristic Province Mexico, United States No
Caribbean Islands Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, Aruba, Bahamas, Barbados, Cayman Islands, Cuba, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Haiti, Grenada, Guadeloupe, Jamaica, Martinique, Montserrat, Netherlands Antilles, Puerto Rico, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent And The Grenadines, Trinidad and Tobago, Turks And Caicos Islands, Virgin Islands - British, Virgin Islands - U.S. No
Mesoamerica Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama No

Predators

Aquila chrysaetos (Golden Eagle)[6]
Corvus corax (Northern Raven)[6]
Falco peregrinus (Peregrine Falcon)[6]
Larus hyperboreus (Glaucous Gull)[6]

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

Middle America; North America; Oceania; Western Michigan University’s Asylum Lake;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Nathan P. Myhrvold, Elita Baldridge, Benjamin Chan, Dhileep Sivam, Daniel L. Freeman, and S. K. Morgan Ernest. 2015. An amniote life-history database to perform comparative analyses with birds, mammals, and reptiles. Ecology 96:3109
2de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
3Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
4Jetz W, Sekercioglu CH, Böhning-Gaese K (2008) The Worldwide Variation in Avian Clutch Size across Species and Space PLoS Biol 6(12): e303. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.0060303
5Spring Bay Important Bird Area Conservation Plan, William G. Wilson and Edward D. Cheskey, Spring Bay Important Bird Area Steering Committee, July 2001
6Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
7Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License