Animalia > Chordata > Aves > Gruiformes > Gruidae > Grus > Grus rubicunda
 

Grus rubicunda (Brolga)

Wikipedia Abstract

The brolga (Grus rubicunda), formerly known as the native companion, is a bird in the crane family. It has also been given the name Australian crane, a term coined in 1865 by well-known ornithological artist John Gould in his Birds of Australia. Although the bird is not considered endangered over the majority of its range, populations are showing some decline, especially in southern Australia, and local action plans are being undertaken in some areas. It is the official bird emblem of the state of Queensland.
View Wikipedia Record: Grus rubicunda

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
7
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
24
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 6.37203
EDGE Score: 1.99769

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  13.779 lbs (6.25 kg)
Birth Weight [2]  181 grams
Female Weight [1]  12.485 lbs (5.663 kg)
Male Weight [1]  15.075 lbs (6.838 kg)
Weight Dimorphism [1]  20.7 %
Diet [3]  Carnivore (Invertebrates), Carnivore (Vertebrates), Granivore, Herbivore
Diet - Ectothermic [3]  10 %
Diet - Endothermic [3]  10 %
Diet - Invertibrates [3]  10 %
Diet - Plants [3]  40 %
Diet - Seeds [3]  30 %
Forages - Ground [3]  50 %
Forages - Water Surface [3]  50 %
Clutch Size [5]  2
Incubation [4]  29 days
Maximum Longevity [6]  33 years
Wing Span [4]  7.052 feet (2.15 m)

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
Southwest Australia Australia No

Emblem of

Queensland

Prey / Diet

Eleocharis dulcis (Chinese water chestnut)[4]

Prey / Diet Overlap

Competing SpeciesCommon Prey Count
Irediparra gallinacea (Comb-crested Jacana)1

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Esthiopterum giganteum <Unverified Name>[7]
Saemundssonia integer[7]

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Distribution

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Marchant, S.; Higgins, PJ (eds.) 1993. The handbook of Australian, New Zealand and Antarctic birds, Vol. 2., raptors to lapwings. Oxford University Press, Melbourne
2Terje Lislevand, Jordi Figuerola, and Tamás Székely. 2007. Avian body sizes in relation to fecundity, mating system, display behavior, and resource sharing. Ecology 88:1605
3Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
4del Hoyo, J., Elliott, A., Sargatal, J., Christie, D.A. & de Juana, E. (eds.). Handbook of the Birds of the World Alive. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.
5Jetz W, Sekercioglu CH, Böhning-Gaese K (2008) The Worldwide Variation in Avian Clutch Size across Species and Space PLoS Biol 6(12): e303. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.0060303
6de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
7Species Interactions of Australia Database, Atlas of Living Australia, Version ala-csv-2012-11-19
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License