Animalia > Chordata > Aves > Gruiformes > Gruidae > Grus > Grus vipio
 

Grus vipio (White-naped Crane)

Wikipedia Abstract

The white-naped crane (Grus vipio) is a bird of the crane family. It is a large bird, 112–125 cm (44–49 in) long, approximately 130 cm (4.3 ft) tall and weighing about 5.6 kg (12 lb) with pinkish legs, grey and white striped neck, and a red face patch. Its diet consists mainly of insects, seeds, roots, plants and small animals. Due to ongoing habitat loss and overhunting in some areas, the white-naped crane is evaluated as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. It is listed on Appendix I and II of CITES. \n* \n* Juvenile \n* Adult and egg \n* \n* Head \n* At Cotswold Wildlife Park, England
View Wikipedia Record: Grus vipio

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
3
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
41
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 6.79618
EDGE Score: 3.43993

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  10.28 lbs (4.663 kg)
Birth Weight [1]  116 grams
Diet [2]  Carnivore (Invertebrates), Carnivore (Vertebrates), Granivore, Herbivore
Diet - Invertibrates [2]  20 %
Diet - Plants [2]  40 %
Diet - Seeds [2]  30 %
Diet - Vertibrates [2]  10 %
Forages - Ground [2]  50 %
Forages - Water Surface [2]  50 %
Female Maturity [3]  3 years
Male Maturity [3]  3 years
Clutch Size [4]  2
Clutches / Year [1]  1
Incubation [3]  31 days
Maximum Longevity [3]  45 years
Migration [5]  Intracontinental
Wing Span [6]  6.724 feet (2.05 m)

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Important Bird Areas

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
Japan Japan No

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Nathan P. Myhrvold, Elita Baldridge, Benjamin Chan, Dhileep Sivam, Daniel L. Freeman, and S. K. Morgan Ernest. 2015. An amniote life-history database to perform comparative analyses with birds, mammals, and reptiles. Ecology 96:3109
2Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
3de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
4Jetz W, Sekercioglu CH, Böhning-Gaese K (2008) The Worldwide Variation in Avian Clutch Size across Species and Space PLoS Biol 6(12): e303. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.0060303
5Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
6del Hoyo, J., Elliott, A., Sargatal, J., Christie, D.A. & de Juana, E. (eds.). Handbook of the Birds of the World Alive. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Protected Areas provided by Ramsar Sites Information Service
Specially protected natural territories of the Russian Federation, Ministry of Natural Resources and Environment of the Russian Federation
Biological Inventories of the World's Protected Areas in cooperation between the Information Center for the Environment at the University of California, Davis and numerous collaborators.
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License