Animalia > Chordata > Aves > Gruiformes > Gruidae > Balearica > Balearica pavonina
 

Balearica pavonina (Black Crowned Crane)

Wikipedia Abstract

The black crowned crane (Balearica pavonina) is a bird in the crane family Gruidae. It occurs in dry savannah in Africa south of the Sahara, although in nests in somewhat wetter habitats. There are two subspecies: B. p. pavonina in the west and the more numerous B. p. ceciliae in east Africa. Like all cranes, the black crowned crane eats insects, reptiles, and small mammals. It is endangered, especially in the west, by habitat loss and degradation.
View Wikipedia Record: Balearica pavonina

Infraspecies

Balearica pavonina ceciliae (Sudan black-crowned crane)
Balearica pavonina pavonina (West African black-crowned crane)

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
15
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
58
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 12.0682
EDGE Score: 3.95648

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  8.001 lbs (3.629 kg)
Birth Weight [1]  137 grams
Diet [2]  Carnivore (Invertebrates), Carnivore (Vertebrates), Piscivore, Granivore, Herbivore
Diet - Ectothermic [2]  20 %
Diet - Fish [2]  10 %
Diet - Invertibrates [2]  30 %
Diet - Plants [2]  30 %
Diet - Seeds [2]  10 %
Forages - Ground [2]  50 %
Forages - Water Surface [2]  50 %
Clutch Size [4]  2
Incubation [3]  29 days
Wing Span [3]  6.232 feet (1.9 m)

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Important Bird Areas

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
Eastern Afromontane Burundi, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, Tanzania, Uganda, Yemen, Zimbabwe No

Emblem of

Nigeria

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Eucoleus obtusiuscula <Unverified Name>[5]

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Terje Lislevand, Jordi Figuerola, and Tamás Székely. 2007. Avian body sizes in relation to fecundity, mating system, display behavior, and resource sharing. Ecology 88:1605
2Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
3del Hoyo, J., Elliott, A., Sargatal, J., Christie, D.A. & de Juana, E. (eds.). Handbook of the Birds of the World Alive. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.
4Jetz W, Sekercioglu CH, Böhning-Gaese K (2008) The Worldwide Variation in Avian Clutch Size across Species and Space PLoS Biol 6(12): e303. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.0060303
5Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License