Animalia > Chordata > Aves > Gruiformes > Aramidae > Aramus > Aramus guarauna
 

Aramus guarauna (Limpkin)

Language: Spanish

Wikipedia Abstract

The limpkin (Aramus guarauna), also called carrao, courlan, and crying bird, is a bird that looks like a large rail but is skeletally closer to cranes. It is the only extant species in the genus Aramus and the family Aramidae. It is found mostly in wetlands in warm parts of the Americas, from Florida to northern Argentina. It feeds on molluscs, with the diet dominated by apple snails of the genus Pomacea. Its name derives from its seeming limp when it walks.
View Wikipedia Record: Aramus guarauna

Infraspecies

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
39
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
48
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 29.2353
EDGE Score: 3.40901

Attributes

Clutch Size [2]  6
Incubation [5]  27 days
Water Biome [1]  Rivers and Streams, Coastal
Adult Weight [2]  2.425 lbs (1.10 kg)
Breeding Habitat [3]  Temperate eastern forests, Freshwater marshes
Wintering Geography [3]  Non-migrartory
Wintering Habitat [3]  Temperate eastern forests, Freshwater marshes
Diet [4]  Carnivore (Invertebrates), Carnivore (Vertebrates)
Diet - Ectothermic [4]  20 %
Diet - Invertibrates [4]  50 %
Diet - Vertibrates [4]  30 %
Forages - Ground [4]  50 %
Forages - Water Surface [4]  50 %

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Biodiversity Hotspots

Predators

Caiman crocodilus (Common caiman, Spectacled caiman)[6]

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Amidostomum acutum[7]
Lyperorchis inexpectabilis <Unverified Name>[7]
Lyperorchis lyperorchis <Unverified Name>[7]

Range Map

Distribution

Caribbean; Middle America; North America; South America;

External References

Audio

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Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
2Terje Lislevand, Jordi Figuerola, and Tamás Székely. 2007. Avian body sizes in relation to fecundity, mating system, display behavior, and resource sharing. Ecology 88:1605
3Partners in Flight Avian Conservation Assessment Database, version 2017. Accessed on January 2018.
4Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
5del Hoyo, J., Elliott, A., Sargatal, J., Christie, D.A. & de Juana, E. (eds.). Handbook of the Birds of the World Alive. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.
6Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
7Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
Audio software provided by SoundManager 2