Animalia > Chordata > Aves > Charadriiformes > Recurvirostridae > Himantopus > Himantopus mexicanus
 

Himantopus mexicanus (Black-necked Stilt; Hawaiian Stilt)

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Wikipedia Abstract

The black-necked stilt (Himantopus mexicanus) is a locally abundant shorebird of American wetlands and coastlines. It is found from the coastal areas of California through much of the interior western United States and along the Gulf of Mexico as far east as Florida, then south through Central America and the Caribbean to northwest Brazil southwest Peru, east Ecuador and the Galápagos Islands. The northernmost populations, particularly those from inland, are migratory, wintering from the extreme south of the United States to southern Mexico, rarely as far south as Costa Rica; on the Baja California peninsula it is only found regularly in winter.
View Wikipedia Record: Himantopus mexicanus

Infraspecies

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
4
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
23
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 8.57268
EDGE Score: 2.25891

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  169 grams
Birth Weight [3]  14 grams
Breeding Habitat [2]  Freshwater marshes, Saline lakes
Wintering Geography [2]  Widespread
Wintering Habitat [2]  Wetlands, Agricultural
Diet [4]  Carnivore (Invertebrates)
Diet - Invertibrates [4]  100 %
Forages - Water Surface [4]  100 %
Clutch Size [3]  4
Clutches / Year [3]  1
Fledging [1]  29 days
Global Population (2017 est.) [2]  900,000
Incubation [3]  25 days
Maximum Longevity [3]  19 years
Female Maturity [3]  1 year
Male Maturity [3]  1 year

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Ecosystems

Important Bird Areas

Name Location  IBA Criteria   Website   Climate   Land Use 
Jobos Bay Puerto Rico (to USA) A1, A2, A4iii, B4i
Salton Sea USA A4i
Suroeste Puerto Rico (to USA) A1, A2, A4i, A4iii, B4i

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
California Floristic Province Mexico, United States No
Polynesia-Micronesia Fiji, Micronesia, Polynesia, Samoa, Tonga, United States No

Predators

Haliaeetus leucocephalus (Bald Eagle)[5]

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

North America;

External References

Audio

Play / PauseVolume
Provided by Xeno-canto under a Creative Commons BY-NC-ND 2.5 License Author: Juan Pablo Culasso

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Nathan P. Myhrvold, Elita Baldridge, Benjamin Chan, Dhileep Sivam, Daniel L. Freeman, and S. K. Morgan Ernest. 2015. An amniote life-history database to perform comparative analyses with birds, mammals, and reptiles. Ecology 96:3109
2Partners in Flight Avian Conservation Assessment Database, version 2017. Accessed on January 2018.
3de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
4Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
5Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
6Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
Audio software provided by SoundManager 2