Animalia > Chordata > Aves > Charadriiformes > Laridae > Larus > Larus dominicanus
 

Larus dominicanus (Kelp Gull)

Language: Spanish

Wikipedia Abstract

The kelp gull (Larus dominicanus), also known as the Dominican gull, is a gull which breeds on coasts and islands through much of the southern hemisphere. The nominate L. d. dominicanus is the subspecies found around South America, parts of Australia (where it overlaps with the Pacific gull), and New Zealand (where it is known as the southern black-backed gull or by its Māori name karoro). L. d. vetula (known as the Cape gull) is a subspecies occurring around southern Africa. The specific name comes from the Dominican Order of friars, who wear black and white habits.
View Wikipedia Record: Larus dominicanus

Infraspecies

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
0
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
5
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 1.27176
EDGE Score: 0.820557

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  2.075 lbs (941 g)
Birth Weight [2]  84.2 grams
Female Weight [1]  1.834 lbs (832 g)
Male Weight [1]  2.315 lbs (1.05 kg)
Weight Dimorphism [1]  26.2 %
Diet [3]  Carnivore (Invertebrates), Carnivore (Vertebrates), Piscivore
Diet - Ectothermic [3]  20 %
Diet - Endothermic [3]  20 %
Diet - Fish [3]  20 %
Diet - Invertibrates [3]  20 %
Diet - Scavenger [3]  20 %
Forages - Ground [3]  50 %
Forages - Water Surface [3]  50 %
Clutch Size [2]  2
Incubation [4]  27 days
Wing Span [4]  4.428 feet (1.35 m)

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Important Bird Areas

Biodiversity Hotspots

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

    Maps
Institution Infraspecies / Breed 
Jardin Zoologico de Cdad.Buenos Aires
John Ball Zoological Garden
Parque De Animales Silvestres Temaikèn
Zool.Nacional Parque Metro De Santiago

Range Map

Distribution

External References

Audio

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Provided by Xeno-canto under a Creative Commons BY-NC-ND 2.5 License Author: Sofia Wasylyk

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Higgins, PJ and Davies, SJJF (Eds). (1996). Handbook of Australian, New Zealand & Antarctic Birds. Vol. 3, Snipe to Pigeons. Oxford University Press, Melbourne
2Terje Lislevand, Jordi Figuerola, and Tamás Székely. 2007. Avian body sizes in relation to fecundity, mating system, display behavior, and resource sharing. Ecology 88:1605
3Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
4del Hoyo, J., Elliott, A., Sargatal, J., Christie, D.A. & de Juana, E. (eds.). Handbook of the Birds of the World Alive. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.
5Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
6Predation of marine invertebrates by the kelp gull Larus dominicanus in an undisturbed intertidal rocky shore of central Chile, INGRID BAHAMONDES and JUAN C. CASTILLA, Revista Chilena de Historia Natural 59: 65-72, 1986
7DENSITIES OF ANTARCTIC SEABIRDS AT SEA AND THE PRESENCE OF THE KRILL EUPHAUSIA SUPERBA, BRYAN S. OBST, The Auk 102: 540-549. July 1985
8Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
9Species Interactions of Australia Database, Atlas of Living Australia, Version ala-csv-2012-11-19
10International Flea Database
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
Audio software provided by SoundManager 2