Animalia > Chordata > Aves > Psittaciformes > Psittacidae > Psittacula > Psittacula krameri
 

Psittacula krameri (Rose-ringed Parakeet)

Wikipedia Abstract

The rose-ringed parakeet (Psittacula krameri), also known as the ring-necked parakeet, is a gregarious tropical Afro-Asian parakeet species that has an extremely large range. The rose-ringed parakeet is sexually dimorphic. The adult male sports a red or black neck ring and the hen and immature birds of both sexes either show no neck rings, or display shadow-like pale to dark grey neck rings. Both sexes have a distinctive green colour. Rose-ringed parakeets measure on average 40 cm (16 in) in length, including the tail feathers, a large portion of their total length. Their average single-wing length is about 15–17.5 cm (5.9–6.9 in). In the wild, this is a noisy species with an unmistakable squawking call. It is herbivorous and not migratory.
View Wikipedia Record: Psittacula krameri

Infraspecies

Psittacula krameri borealis (Indian rose-ringed parakeet)
Psittacula krameri krameri (Rose-ringed parakeet)
Psittacula krameri manillensis (Sri Lanka rose-ringed parakeet)
Psittacula krameri parvirostris (Sudan rose-ringed parakeet)

Invasive Species

The rose-ringed parakeet, Psittacula krameri, is native to central Africa and Asia and is a colourful, distinctive-looking bird. It is known as one of the most successful avian invaders in the world, with established populations in over 35 countries outside its native range. P. krameri has been shown to have adverse impacts on native bird species and carry diseases. It is thought that its reproductive success, establishment and range expansion in non-native areas is related to climate similarities of non-native areas to that of its native range.
View ISSG Record: Psittacula krameri

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
1
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
14
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 4.22413
EDGE Score: 1.65329

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  133 grams
Diet [2]  Frugivore, Nectarivore, Granivore, Herbivore
Diet - Fruit [2]  50 %
Diet - Nectar [2]  10 %
Diet - Plants [2]  20 %
Diet - Seeds [2]  20 %
Forages - Canopy [2]  10 %
Forages - Mid-High [2]  30 %
Forages - Understory [2]  30 %
Forages - Ground [2]  30 %
Clutch Size [4]  4
Fledging [1]  46 days
Incubation [3]  23 days
Maximum Longevity [5]  34 years
Snout to Vent Length [1]  16 inches (40 cm)
Wing Span [3]  18 inches (.45 m)
Female Maturity [1]  2 years 5 months

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Biodiversity Hotspots

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

+ Click for partial list (55)Full list (206)

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Davainea kramerii <Unverified Name>[9]
Killigrewia srivastavai <Unverified Name>[9]

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Distribution

North America; Oceania;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Nathan P. Myhrvold, Elita Baldridge, Benjamin Chan, Dhileep Sivam, Daniel L. Freeman, and S. K. Morgan Ernest. 2015. An amniote life-history database to perform comparative analyses with birds, mammals, and reptiles. Ecology 96:3109
2Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
3British Trust for Ornithology
4Jetz W, Sekercioglu CH, Böhning-Gaese K (2008) The Worldwide Variation in Avian Clutch Size across Species and Space PLoS Biol 6(12): e303. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.0060303
5de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
6Feeding Ecology of Rose-Ringed Parakeet Psittacula krameri in Polonnaruwa, Sarath.W.Kotagama, G.M.Dunnet, Siyoth Vol. 2(2): 50-55 (2007)
7Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
8"Fig-eating by vertebrate frugivores: a global review", MIKE SHANAHAN, SAMSON SO, STEPHEN G. COMPTON and RICHARD CORLETT, Biol. Rev. (2001), 76, pp. 529–572
9Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Protected Areas provided by Biological Inventories of the World's Protected Areas in cooperation between the Information Center for the Environment at the University of California, Davis and numerous collaborators.
Ramsar Sites Information Service
Natura 2000, UK data: © Crown copyright and database right [2010] All rights reserved. Ordnance Survey Licence number 100017955
GBIF Global Biodiversity Information Facility
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License