Animalia > Chordata > Aves > Psittaciformes > Psittacidae > Amazona > Amazona brasiliensis
 

Amazona brasiliensis (Red-tailed Amazon; Red-tailed Parrot)

Wikipedia Abstract

The red-tailed amazon (Amazona brasiliensis), also known as the red-tailed parrot, is a species of parrot in the family Psittacidae. It is endemic to coastal regions in the south-east Brazilian states of São Paulo and Paraná. The bird has been threatened by habitat loss and capture for the wild bird trade, and is a symbol of the efforts to conserve one of the Earth's most biologically diverse ecosystems. Consequently, it is considered vulnerable by BirdLife International and the IUCN. In 1991-92, the population had fallen below 2000 individuals. Following on-going conservation efforts, the most recent estimate suggests a population of around 6600, indicating that this species is recovering from earlier persecution. A recent study shows that the population of this species is stable at Paran
View Wikipedia Record: Amazona brasiliensis

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
1
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
33
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 3.62017
EDGE Score: 2.91673

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  442 grams
Diet [2]  Carnivore (Invertebrates), Frugivore, Nectarivore, Granivore, Herbivore
Diet - Fruit [2]  40 %
Diet - Invertibrates [2]  10 %
Diet - Nectar [2]  10 %
Diet - Plants [2]  20 %
Diet - Seeds [2]  20 %
Forages - Canopy [2]  20 %
Forages - Mid-High [2]  50 %
Forages - Understory [2]  30 %
Clutch Size [4]  4
Incubation [3]  27 days
Snout to Vent Length [1]  14 inches (35 cm)

Ecoregions

Name Countries Ecozone Biome Species Report Climate Land
Use
Araucaria moist forests Brazil Neotropic Tropical and Subtropical Moist Broadleaf Forests
Serra do Mar coastal forests Brazil Neotropic Tropical and Subtropical Moist Broadleaf Forests  

Protected Areas

Important Bird Areas

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
Atlantic Forest Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay Yes

Prey / Diet

Calophyllum brasiliense (Alexandrian laurel)[3]
Psidium cattleianum (Cattley guava)[3]
Syagrus romanzoffiana (Queen Palm)[3]

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Leucopternis polionotus (Mantled hawk)[3]

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Nathan P. Myhrvold, Elita Baldridge, Benjamin Chan, Dhileep Sivam, Daniel L. Freeman, and S. K. Morgan Ernest. 2015. An amniote life-history database to perform comparative analyses with birds, mammals, and reptiles. Ecology 96:3109
2Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
3del Hoyo, J., Elliott, A., Sargatal, J., Christie, D.A. & de Juana, E. (eds.). Handbook of the Birds of the World Alive. Lynx Edicions, Barcelona.
4Jetz W, Sekercioglu CH, Böhning-Gaese K (2008) The Worldwide Variation in Avian Clutch Size across Species and Space PLoS Biol 6(12): e303. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.0060303
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Protected Areas provided by Le Saout, S., Hoffmann, M., Shi, Y., Hughes, A., Bernard, C., Brooks, T.M., Bertzky, B., Butchart, S.H.M., Stuart, S.N., Badman, T. & Rodrigues, A.S.L. (2013) Protected areas and effective biodiversity conservation. Science, 342, 803–805
Biological Inventories of the World's Protected Areas in cooperation between the Information Center for the Environment at the University of California, Davis and numerous collaborators.
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License