Animalia > Chordata > Aves > Psittaciformes > Psittacidae > Cacatua > Cacatua galerita
 

Cacatua galerita (Sulphur-crested Cockatoo)

Wikipedia Abstract

The sulphur-crested cockatoo (Cacatua galerita) is a relatively large white cockatoo found in wooded habitats in Australia and New Guinea and some of the islands of Indonesia. They can be locally very numerous, leading to them sometimes being considered pests. They are well known in aviculture, although they can be demanding pets.
View Wikipedia Record: Cacatua galerita

Infraspecies

Cacatua galerita eleonora (Aru Island sulphur-crested cockatoo)
Cacatua galerita fitzroyi (Northern sulphur-crested cockatoo) (Attributes)
Cacatua galerita galerita (Sulphur-crested cockatoo) (Attributes)
Cacatua galerita triton (New Guinea sulphur-crested cockatoo)

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
2
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
16
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 5.25885
EDGE Score: 1.834

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  1.032 lbs (468 g)
Female Weight [1]  367 grams
Male Weight [1]  1.257 lbs (570 g)
Weight Dimorphism [1]  55.3 %
Diet [2]  Frugivore, Granivore, Herbivore
Diet - Fruit [2]  40 %
Diet - Plants [2]  20 %
Diet - Seeds [2]  40 %
Forages - Canopy [2]  20 %
Forages - Mid-High [2]  30 %
Forages - Understory [2]  10 %
Forages - Ground [2]  40 %
Clutch Size [4]  2
Clutches / Year [1]  1
Fledging [1]  70 days
Incubation [3]  27 days
Mating Display [5]  Ground display
Mating System [5]  Monogamy
Maximum Longevity [3]  57 years
Snout to Vent Length [1]  18 inches (45 cm)
Female Maturity [1]  4 years
Male Maturity [1]  3 years 6 months

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
Southwest Australia Australia No

Prey / Diet

Bambusa arnhemica[6]
Ficus macrophylla (Moreton Bay Fig)[7]
Glyptostrobus pensilis (Chinese Water Fir)[8]
Triticum aestivum (common wheat)[8]

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Aquila audax (Wedge-tailed Eagle)[9]

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Distribution

Oceania;

External References

Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1Nathan P. Myhrvold, Elita Baldridge, Benjamin Chan, Dhileep Sivam, Daniel L. Freeman, and S. K. Morgan Ernest. 2015. An amniote life-history database to perform comparative analyses with birds, mammals, and reptiles. Ecology 96:3109
2Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
3de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
4Jetz W, Sekercioglu CH, Böhning-Gaese K (2008) The Worldwide Variation in Avian Clutch Size across Species and Space PLoS Biol 6(12): e303. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.0060303
5Terje Lislevand, Jordi Figuerola, and Tamás Székely. 2007. Avian body sizes in relation to fecundity, mating system, display behavior, and resource sharing. Ecology 88:1605
6Avian granivores consume flowers, not just seed, of the Top End Bamboo Bambusa arnhemica, Donald C. Franklin, Northern Territory Naturalist (2005) 18: 45-50
7"Fig-eating by vertebrate frugivores: a global review", MIKE SHANAHAN, SAMSON SO, STEPHEN G. COMPTON and RICHARD CORLETT, Biol. Rev. (2001), 76, pp. 529–572
8Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
9Olsen, J., Judge, D., Fuentes, E., Rose, AB and Debus, S. (2010). Diets of Wedge-tailed Eagles (Aquila audax) and Little Eagles (Hieraaetus morphnoides) breeding near Canberra, Australia Journal of Raptor Research 44: 50–61
10Species Interactions of Australia Database, Atlas of Living Australia, Version ala-csv-2012-11-19
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License