Animalia > Chordata > Aves > Strigiformes > Strigidae > Bubo > Bubo virginianus
 

Bubo virginianus (Great Horned Owl)

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Wikipedia Abstract

The great horned owl (Bubo virginianus), also known as the tiger owl (originally derived from early naturalists' description as the "winged tiger" or "tiger of the air") or the hoot owl, is a large owl native to the Americas. It is an extremely adaptable bird with a vast range and is the most widely distributed true owl in the Americas. Its primary diet appears to be rabbits and hares, rats and mice and voles, although it freely hunts any animal it can overtake, primarily other rodents and small mammals, but also larger mid-sized mammals, various birds, reptiles, amphibians and invertebrates. In ornithological study, the great horned owl is often compared to the Eurasian eagle-owl (Bubo bubo), a closely related species which, despite the latter's notably larger size, occupies the same ecol
View Wikipedia Record: Bubo virginianus

Infraspecies

Bubo virginianus algistus (Synonym of Bubo virginianus lagophonus, Northwestern horned owl)
Bubo virginianus elachistus (Dwarf horned owl)
Bubo virginianus heterocnemis (Newfoundland horned owl)
Bubo virginianus lagophonus (Northwestern horned owl)
Bubo virginianus mayensis (Yucatan horned owl)
Bubo virginianus mesembrinus (Oaxaca horned owl)
Bubo virginianus nacurutu (Venezuelan great horned owl)
Bubo virginianus nigrescens (Ecuadorian great horned owl)
Bubo virginianus pacificus (Coast horned owl)
Bubo virginianus pallescens (Virginia great horned owl) (Attributes)
Bubo virginianus saturatus (St Michael horned owl)
Bubo virginianus subarcticus
Bubo virginianus virginianus (Northern great horned owl) (Attributes)

Invasive Species

Bubo virginianus was intentionally introduced to Hiva Oa in French Polynesia to combat rats. This bird of prey has affected all native birds on the island.
View ISSG Record: Bubo virginianus

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
7
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
25
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 6.47536
EDGE Score: 2.01161

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  2.919 lbs (1.324 kg)
Birth Weight [3]  35 grams
Female Weight [1]  3.322 lbs (1.507 kg)
Male Weight [1]  2.518 lbs (1.142 kg)
Weight Dimorphism [1]  32 %
Breeding Habitat [2]  Generalist
Wintering Geography [2]  Non-migrartory
Wintering Habitat [2]  Generalist
Diet [4]  Carnivore (Invertebrates), Carnivore (Vertebrates)
Diet - Endothermic [4]  90 %
Diet - Invertibrates [4]  10 %
Forages - Understory [4]  10 %
Forages - Ground [4]  80 %
Forages - Water Surface [4]  10 %
Female Maturity [3]  2 years
Male Maturity [3]  2 years
Clutch Size [5]  2
Clutches / Year [3]  1
Global Population (2017 est.) [2]  6,500,000
Incubation [3]  27 days
Maximum Longevity [3]  29 years
Nocturnal [4]  Yes
Wing Span [6]  4.395 feet (1.34 m)

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

+ Click for partial list (100)Full list (323)

Ecosystems

Biodiversity Hotspots

Emblem of

Alberta

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

+ Click for partial list (61)Full list (102)

Predators

Accipiter gentilis (Northern Goshawk)[8]
Aquila chrysaetos (Golden Eagle)[8]

Consumers

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

North America; Patfa Valley dry forests; Western Michigan University’s Asylum Lake;

External References

Audio

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Citations

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1Kemp, AC. 1989. Estimation of Biological Indices for Little-known African Owls Meyburg, B.-U & R. D. Chancellor eds. 1989 Raptors in the Modern World WWGBP: Berlin, London & Paris
2Partners in Flight Avian Conservation Assessment Database, version 2017. Accessed on January 2018.
3de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
4Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
5Jetz W, Sekercioglu CH, Böhning-Gaese K (2008) The Worldwide Variation in Avian Clutch Size across Species and Space PLoS Biol 6(12): e303. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.0060303
6Wing Loading in 15 Species of North American Owls, Duncan, James R.; Johnson, David H.; Nicholls, Thomas H., eds. Biology and conservation of owls of the Northern Hemisphere: 2nd International symposium. Gen. Tech. Rep. NC-190. St. Paul, MN: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Forest Experiment Station. 553-561 (1997)
7Predation upon small mammals in shrublands and grasslands of southern South America: ecological correlates and presumable consequences, Fabian M. Jaksic, Revista Chilena de Historia Natural 59: 209-221 (1986)
8Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
9Myers, P., R. Espinosa, C. S. Parr, T. Jones, G. S. Hammond, and T. A. Dewey. 2006. The Animal Diversity Web (online). Accessed February 01, 2010 at animaldiversity.org
10DIET OF THE GREAT HORNED OWL IN THE CRESTON VALLEY, BRITISH COLUMBIA, 1998 - 2005, Linda M. Van Damme, Wildlife Afield 2:2 December 2005, pp. 73-78
11Neotoma cinerea, Felisa A. Smith, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 564, pp. 1-8 (1997)
12SPECIES ASSESSMENT FOR SAGE SPARROW (AMPHISPIZA BELLI) IN WYOMING, PAULA L. HANSLEY AND DR. GARY P. BEAUVAIS, United States Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, September 2004
13Baiomys taylori, Bruce D. Eshelman and Guy N. Cameron, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 285, pp. 1-7 (1987)
14Blarina brevicauda, Sarah B. George, Jerry R. Choate, and Hugh H. Genoways, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 261, pp. 1-9 (1986)
15SPECIES ASSESSMENT FOR PYGMY RABBIT (BRACHYLAGUS IDAHOENSIS) IN WYOMING, DOUGLAS A. KEINATH AND MATTHEW MCGEE, United States Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management Wyoming State Office Cheyenne, Wyoming (2004)
16Spermophilus saturatus, Stephan C. Trombulak, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 322, pp. 1-4 (1988)
17Chaetodipus hispidus, Deborah D. Paulson, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 320, pp. 1-4 (1988)
18Chaetodipus nelsoni, Troy L. Best, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 484, pp. 1-6 (1994)
19Conepatus leuconotus (Carnivora: Mephitidae), JERRY W. DRAGOO AND STEVEN R. SHEFFIELD, MAMMALIAN SPECIES 827:1–8 (2009)
20Dipodomys heermanni, Douglas A. Kelt, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 323, pp. 1-7 (1988)
21Dipodomys ingens, Daniel F. Williams and Kerry S. Kilburn, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 377, pp. 1-7 (1991)
22Dipodomys ordii, Tom E. Garrison and Troy L. Best, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 353, pp. 1-10 (1990)
23Dipodomys spectabilis, Troy L. Best, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 311, pp. 1-10 (1988)
24Predators of the Swallow-Tailed Kite in Southern Louisiana and Mississippi, Jennifer O. Coulson, Thomas D. Coulson, Sherry A. DeFrancesch, and Thomas W. Sherry, Journal of Raptor Research 42(1):1-12. 2008
25Geomys breviceps, James M. Sulentich, Lawrence R. Williams, and Guy N. Cameron, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 383, pp. 1-4 (1991)
26Geomys bursarius (Rodentia: Geomyidae), MATTHEW B. CONNIOR, MAMMALIAN SPECIES 43(879):104–117 (2011)
27The Cactus Ferruginous Pygmy-Owl: Taxonomy, Distribution, and Natural History, Jean-Luc E. Cartron, W. Scott Richardson, Glenn A. Proudfoot, USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-43. 2000
28Glaucomys sabrinus, Nancy Wells-Gosling and Lawrence R. Heaney, Mammalian Species No. 229, pp. 1-8 (1984)
29Irenomys tarsalis, Douglas A. Kelt, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 447, pp. 1-3 (1993)
30Lasiurus borealis, Karl A. Shump Jr. and Ann U. Shump, Mammalian Species No. 183, pp. 1-6 (1982)
31Lemmiscus curtatus, Lynn E. Carroll and Hugh H. Genoways, Mammalian Species No. 124, pp. 1-6 (1980)
32Lepus californicus, Troy L. Best, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 530, pp. 1-10 (1996)
33Martes americana, Tim W. Clark, Elaine Anderson, Carman Douglas, and Marjorie Strickland, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 289, pp. 1-8 (1987)
34Microtus californicus (Rodentia: Cricetidae), NICHOLE L. CUDWORTH AND JOHN L. KOPROWSKI, MAMMALIAN SPECIES 42(868):230–243 (2010)
35Microtus montanus, Wendy E. Sera and Cathleen N. Early, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 716, pp. 1–10 (2003)
36Microtus pinetorum, Michael J. Smolen, Mammalian Species No. 147, pp. 1-7 (1981)
37Mustela frenata, Steven R. Sheffield and Howard H. Thomas, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 570, pp. 1-9 (1997)
38Neotoma floridana, Robert W. Wiley, Mammalian Species No. 139, pp. 1-7 (1980)
39Neotoma fuscipes, L. N. Carraway and B. J. Verts, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 386, pp. 1-10 (1991)
40Neotoma lepida, B. J. Verts and Leslie N. Carraway, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 699, pp. 1–12 (2002)
41Neotoma micropus, J. K. Braun and M. A. Mares, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 330, pp. 1-9 (1989)
42Neurotrichus gibbsii, L. N. Carraway and B. J. Verts, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 387, pp. 1-7 (1991)
43Notiosorex crawfordi, David M. Armstrong and J. Knox Jones, Jr., MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 17, pp. 1-5 (1972)
44Perognathus flavescens, R. Richard Monk and J. Knox Jone, Jr., MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 525, pp. 1-4 (1996)
45Perognathus flavus, Troy L. Best and Marian P. Skupski, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 471, pp. 1-10 (1994)
46Peromyscus eva, Sergio Ticul Álvarez-Castañeda and Patricia Cortés-Calva, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 738, pp. 1–3 (2003)
47Reithrodon auritus, Ulyses F. J. Pardin ̃as and Carlos A. Galliari, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 664, pp. 1–8 (2001)
48Sciurus niger, John L. Koprowski, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 479, pp. 1-9 (1994)
49Sorex vagrans, Scott W. Gillihan and Kerry R. Foresman, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 744, pp. 1–5 (2004)
50Spalacopus cyanus, Juan C. Torres-Mura and Luis C. Contreras, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No.594, pp. 1-5 (1998)
51Spilogale putorius, Al Kinlaw, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 511, pp. 1-7 (1995)
52Feeding Ecology and Nesting Success of Forster's Terns on Lake Osakis, Minnesota, Gail Fraser, Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, 1994
53Sylvilagus audubonii, Joseph A. Chapman and Gale R. Willner, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 106, pp. 1-4 (1978)
54Sylvilagus bachmani, Joseph A. Chapman, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 34, pp. 1-4 (1974)
55Sylvilagus nuttallii, Joseph A. Chapman, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 56, pp. 1-3 (1975)
56Sylvilagus palustris, Joseph A. Chapman and Gale R. Willner, Mammalian Species No. 153, pp. 1-3 (1981)
57Tadarida brasiliensis, Kenneth T. Wilkins, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 331, pp. 1-10 (1989)
58Tamias merriami, Troy L. Best and Nancy J. Granai, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 476, pp. 1-9 (1994)
59Thomomys bottae, Cheri A. Jones and Colleen N. Baxter, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 742, pp. 1–14 (2004)
60Thomomys bulbivorus, B. J. Verts and Leslie N. Carraway, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 273, pp. 1-4 (1987)
61Thomomys talpoides, B. J. Verts and Leslie N. Carraway, MAMMALIAN SPECIES No. 618, pp. 1-11 (1999)
62Urocitellus canus (Rodentia: Sciuridae) F. RUSSELL COLE AND DON E. WILSON, MAMMALIAN SPECIES 834:1–8 (2009)
63Spermophilus richardsonii, Gail R. Michener and James W. Koeppl, Mammalian Species No. 243, pp. 1-8, (1985)
64International Flea Database
65Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
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