Animalia > Chordata > Aves > Passeriformes > Fringillidae > Haemorhous > Haemorhous mexicanus
 

Haemorhous mexicanus (House Finch)

Synonyms: Carpodacus mexicanus
Language: French; Spanish

Wikipedia Abstract

The house finch (Haemorhous mexicanus) is a bird in the finch family Fringillidae. It is native to western North America, and has been introduced to the eastern half of the continent and Hawaii. This species and the other "American rosefinches" are placed in the genus Haemorhous.
View Wikipedia Record: Haemorhous mexicanus

Infraspecies

Invasive Species

Carpodacus mexicanus (house finch) is native to the western United States and Mexico. In 1940, wild birds illegally sold as "Hollywood Finches" in New York were released by dealers anxious to avoid prosecution, and populations now exist throughout eastern North America. In many areas, house finches are not considered a nuisance and are appreciated for their musical song and bright colours. However, they are highly adaptable to urban and suburban environments as they peck and feed on practically all deciduous fruits, berries, grains and seed. Consequently, large populations have become a nuisance, even in their native range, where they have caused economic losses in agricultural areas.
View ISSG Record: Haemorhous mexicanus

EDGE Analysis

Uniqueness Scale: Similiar (0) 
9
 Unique (100)
Uniqueness & Vulnerability Scale: Similiar & Secure (0) 
27
 Unique & Vulnerable (100)
ED Score: 7.42058
EDGE Score: 2.13068

Attributes

Adult Weight [1]  21 grams
Birth Weight [3]  2 grams
Breeding Habitat [2]  Generalist
Wintering Geography [2]  Non-migrartory
Wintering Habitat [2]  Generalist
Diet [4]  Carnivore (Invertebrates), Frugivore, Granivore, Herbivore
Diet - Fruit [4]  30 %
Diet - Invertibrates [4]  10 %
Diet - Plants [4]  30 %
Diet - Seeds [4]  30 %
Forages - Mid-High [4]  33 %
Forages - Understory [4]  33 %
Forages - Ground [4]  33 %
Clutch Size [5]  5
Clutches / Year [1]  3
Global Population (2017 est.) [2]  40,000,000
Incubation [1]  14 days
Maximum Longevity [1]  12 years

Ecoregions

Protected Areas

+ Click for partial list (100)Full list (182)

Ecosystems

Biodiversity Hotspots

Name Location Endemic Species Website
California Floristic Province Mexico, United States No
Madrean Pine-Oak Woodlands Mexico, United States No
Mesoamerica Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama No

Prey / Diet

Prey / Diet Overlap

Predators

Consumers

Parasitized by 
Baylisascaris procyonis[14]
Molothrus ater (Brown-headed Cowbird)[6]

Institutions (Zoos, etc.)

Range Map

Distribution

North America; Oceania; Western Michigan University’s Asylum Lake;

External References

Audio

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Photos

Citations

Attributes / relations provided by
1de Magalhaes, J. P., and Costa, J. (2009) A database of vertebrate longevity records and their relation to other life-history traits. Journal of Evolutionary Biology 22(8):1770-1774
2Partners in Flight Avian Conservation Assessment Database, version 2017. Accessed on January 2018.
3Terje Lislevand, Jordi Figuerola, and Tamás Székely. 2007. Avian body sizes in relation to fecundity, mating system, display behavior, and resource sharing. Ecology 88:1605
4Hamish Wilman, Jonathan Belmaker, Jennifer Simpson, Carolina de la Rosa, Marcelo M. Rivadeneira, and Walter Jetz. 2014. EltonTraits 1.0: Species-level foraging attributes of the world's birds and mammals. Ecology 95:2027
5Jetz W, Sekercioglu CH, Böhning-Gaese K (2008) The Worldwide Variation in Avian Clutch Size across Species and Space PLoS Biol 6(12): e303. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.0060303
6Jorrit H. Poelen, James D. Simons and Chris J. Mungall. (2014). Global Biotic Interactions: An open infrastructure to share and analyze species-interaction datasets. Ecological Informatics.
7Patterns of frugivory, seed dispersal and predation of blue fan palms (Brahea armata) in oases of northern Baja California, E.V. Wehncke, X.L. Medellín, E. Ezcurra, Journal of Arid Environments 73 (2009) 773–783
8How Important are Columnar Cacti as Sources of Water and Nutrients for Desert Consumers? A Review, B. O. Wolf and C. Martínez del Rio, Isotopes Environ. Health Stud., 2003, Vol. 39(1), pp. 53-67
9Effectiveness of Dispersal of an Ornithocorous Cactus Myrtillocactus geometrizans (Cactaceae) in a Patchy Environment, Mónica G. Pérez-Villafaña and Alfonso Valiente-Banuet, The Open Biology Journal, 2009, 2, 101-113
10THE ROLE OF SEED DISPERSERS IN THE POPULATION DYNAMICS OF THE COLUMNAR CACTUS NEOBUXBAUMIA TETETZO, HÉCTOR GODÍNEZ-ALVAREZ, ALFONSO VALIENTE-BANUET, AND ALBERTO ROJAS-MARTÍNEZ, Ecology, 83(9), 2002, pp. 2617-2629
11Seed predation and dispersal in a dominant desert plant: Opuntia, ants, birds, and mammals, Mario González-Espinosa and Pedro F. Quintana-Ascencio, Frugivores and Seed Dispersal (eds A. Estrada & T. H. Fleming.), pp. 273–284. Dr W. Junk, Publishers, Dordrecht.
12The Cactus Ferruginous Pygmy-Owl: Taxonomy, Distribution, and Natural History, Jean-Luc E. Cartron, W. Scott Richardson, Glenn A. Proudfoot, USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. RMRS-GTR-43. 2000
13DIETS OF NORTHERN PYGMY-OWLS AND NORTHERN SAW-WHET OWLS IN WEST-CENTRAL MONTANA, DENVER W. HOLT AND LESLIE A. LEROUX, Wilson Bull., 108(1), 1996, pp. 123-128
14Gibson, D. I., Bray, R. A., & Harris, E. A. (Compilers) (2005). Host-Parasite Database of the Natural History Museum, London
Ecoregions provided by World Wide Fund For Nature (WWF). WildFinder: Online database of species distributions, ver. 01.06 WWF WildFINDER
Biodiversity Hotspots provided by Critical Ecosystem Partnership Fund
Abstract provided by DBpedia licensed under a Creative Commons License
Audio software provided by SoundManager 2